New St Luke’s Campus Biodiversity Trail

The St Luke’s Campus continues to provide a wide range of habitats which help support birds, insects, reptiles, mammals and aquatic life.  The habitats should not be viewed in isolation, as they help form important links and wildlife corridors to other areas of open space not owned or maintained by the University. In this respect, the campus spaces make an important contribution to biodiversity in Exeter and the wider county of Devon.

We have developed a St Luke’s Campus Biodiversity Trail which can be downloaded from our website. Please do take a walk around the campus and see the species supported throughout the year and the techniques we use to support wildlife on campus.

Update – Improvements Works to Hoopern Waterways

We are happy to confirm that the improvement works have started on the top pond and leat at the Hoopern Waterways. The works, funded through donation, aim to improve water quality and biodiversity of the pond network including:

  • Silt removal and control
  • Vegetation control
  • Planting marginal and water plants
  • Improving water flow and aeration

Improvement Works – Hoopern Waterways

The University of Exeter will shortly be carrying out work on the top pond at leat at the Hoopern waterways. The works, funded through donation, aim to improve water quality and biodiversity of the pond network including:

  • Silt removal and control
  • Vegetation control
  • Planting marginal and water plants
  • Improving water flow and aeration

If you require further information, please contact the .

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Higher Hoopern

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NEW Streatham Campus Biodiversity Trail

The Streatham Campus continues to provide a wide range of habitats which help support birds, insects, reptiles, mammals and aquatic life.  The habitats should not be viewed in isolation, as they help form important links and wildlife corridors to other areas of open space not owned or maintained by the University. In this respect, the campus spaces make an important contribution to biodiversity in Exeter and the wider county of Devon.

We have developed a Streatham Campus Biodiversity Trail which can be downloaded from our website. Please do take a walk around the campus and see the species supported throughout the year and the techniques we use to support wildlife on campus.

We are in the process of developing a St Luke’s Campus Biodiversity Trail, which will also available to download.

Front Cover - Streatham Campus Biodiversity Trail

Front Cover – Streatham Campus Biodiversity Trail

Jubilee Water Walk – Guided Tours 22nd & 29th November 2016

This is an opportunity to have a guided tour of the newly developed Jubilee Water Walk.  These walks will be led by the Arts and Culture Co-ordinator, Environment and Sustainability Adviser or the Grounds Team and will provide an insight into the waterways and water features on the Streatham Campus.

22nd November 2016 (Route B) – Art, History and Stories

29th November 2016 (Route B) – Biodiversity and Horticultural Highlights

12.15pm to 1.15pm, meet at the bottom of Stocker Road / Rennes Drive near the roundabout, point 8 on the map

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“Up a lazy river” outdoor choir session – Thursday 22nd September

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“Up a lazy river” outdoor choir session (open to all)

Thursday 22 September 2016, 13:00 to 14:00

Hoopern Valley Ponds (off Rennes Drive) 

Map is available in the event link.

 Come along and sing songs of water that are quick and easy for all to learn by ear. It will be an hour of calm and reflection. As part of the Diamond Waterways Project, we will be celebrating the beauty of our waterways though song and taking advantage of one of our natural amphitheatres. Please check the event listing on the day in case of cancellation.

 Contact for further information.

Pond dipping at Reed Pond

We were very excited to hear the results of the pond dipping, arranged by Dr Clive Betts – Learning and Development Manager and expert entomologist!  He said:

Highlights include two huge cased caddises (and a number of smaller ones), some mature mayfly nymphs of three or more species, loads of copepods and daphnia, some large damselfly nymphs, a nymph of the red-darter dragonfly, a huge ramshorn snail, some lovely leeches (but not too many!), and Norman the Palmate Newt! The other headline is the massive decline in the previously dominant detritivore amphipods and isopods, a positive sign that the excessive allochthonous input prior to the pond works is under control… goes to show that a bit of well-judged management goes a long way.

 

Norman the Newt

Norman the Newt

Intrepid pond dippers

Intrepid pond dippers