Wildflowers Trial – Reed Hall Beds

We are trialling a crop of summer flowering wildflowers at Reed Hall beds this year.

We have had to change the planting scheme and rest the beds this year, as we have had confirmation of a soil borne fungus disease.

We hope you enjoy these colourful wildflowers and we aim to reintroduce the traditional display of spring and summer bedding next year.

Wildflowers at Reed Hall beds July 2019

Wildflowers at Reed Hall beds July 2019

Wildflowers at Reed Hall beds July 2019

Wildflowers at Reed Hall beds July 2019

 

 

National Tree Week

It’s National Tree Week and to celebrate we thought we’d give you some information about our trees. We have over 10,000 trees on our Exeter campuses, over 100 Champion trees, 3 Arboretums and a Jubilee Woodland.

They make an environmental contribution storing 1,951 tonnes of carbon per annum worth £125,000.

We are about to start this season’s tree planting to sustain the campus tree cover.

If you would like to know more about some of our prominent and unusual trees please download the Streatham Campus Tree Trail guide from our website. We are also currently developing a St Luke’s Campus Tree Trail .

Oak Tree at Reed Arboretum

Removal of dead tree at Reed

We have had to remove one of our specimen trees at Reed due to an infestation of the Great Spruce Bark Beetle.  Due to the nature of the infestation – which in itself has nearly killed the tree – and the risk posed to other trees in the area, we have taken the decision to fell and burn on site.

We are hopeful we will be able to gather some propagation material from the tree and grow this on to provide a genetic twin of this tree, with a view to planting it in the same place.

We will be watching other vulnerable trees closely for any other attacks.  If detected early, infestations can be treated with biological controls which help reduce tree mortality.

Tree Timeline

Members of the Campus Services team have created this beautiful timeline.  It is made from a section of the leaning Monterey Pine that stood at the top of the steps by Reed’s formal Italianate Garden.  The timeline now stands where the tree once stood.  The labels show when Reed Hall Gardens were laid out in the 1860s, when Reed was donated to the University in 1920 and when the University received its Royal Charter.Tree timeline Jun 16

Pond dipping at Reed Pond

We were very excited to hear the results of the pond dipping, arranged by Dr Clive Betts – Learning and Development Manager and expert entomologist!  He said:

Highlights include two huge cased caddises (and a number of smaller ones), some mature mayfly nymphs of three or more species, loads of copepods and daphnia, some large damselfly nymphs, a nymph of the red-darter dragonfly, a huge ramshorn snail, some lovely leeches (but not too many!), and Norman the Palmate Newt! The other headline is the massive decline in the previously dominant detritivore amphipods and isopods, a positive sign that the excessive allochthonous input prior to the pond works is under control… goes to show that a bit of well-judged management goes a long way.

 

Norman the Newt

Norman the Newt

Intrepid pond dippers

Intrepid pond dippers

Diamond Jubilee International Garden open

After months of hard work by volunteers, Grounds team and other University staff the Diamond Jubilee International Garden has now had its formal opening event.  Tucked behind Reed Hall, it is an area designated to celebrate the international nature of the University.

The event was well attended, although a little damp!

Launch event - Grounds Team

L-R: Brian, Peter, Phil Attwell (Director of Campus Services), Sam, Emily and Nathan from the Grounds Team.

Launch event - Iain topping out

Iain Park – Director of Grounds gets his hands dirty

Launch event - Iain, Phil and Mike Shore-Nye

L-R: Phil Attwell (Director of Campus Services, Iain Park (Director of Grounds, Mike Shore-Nye (Registrar)

Launch event - International Garden 2 Launch event - International Garden

Grounds Arborists at Work

The Grounds arborists have been hard at work felling and clearing the iconic leaning Monterey pine that had become unstable following Storm Imogen last weekend and had to be felled for safety reasons.

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Leaning Monterey pine before felling work commences

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One of our arborists, Nathan, completing the site specific risk assessment

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Timber!

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Timber again!

 

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Reviewing the risk assessment to safely dismantle and clear the tree

 

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Point of original cut to fell the tree

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Another angle; point of original cut to fell the tree

 

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Contemplating the new landscape

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Agreeing the next chainsaw cut

Photos taken by Emily.

Update – Footpath and Tree Works

Following clearance of the fallen Monterey pine (Pinus radiata), the Reed footpath leading down from the bus stop has re-opened. We will be recycling the timber from the tree to create a seat and table on campus.

The iconic leaning tree was damaged in Storm Imogen last weekend. It was brought over from California in the 1830s and is thought to be one of the original plantings in the UK.

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Leaning Monterey Pine