One Step at a Time

Rowanna Smith is a Careers Consultant based on the Streatham Campus. 

Rowanna Smith, Careers Consultant

TIME – it’s a funny thing. I bet if you look back at your study here at Exeter it’ll feel like it’s flown by, but remembering your first few days arriving on campus it probably feels like a lifetime ago!

Keeping perspective is therefore quite tricky when the goal posts keep moving – completing your first Autumn Term had once seemed like a fantastic challenge, getting a particular grade may have been a goal, now ‘what are you going to do after graduation?’ seems to be the only focus.

So at this particular crossroads, it’s really good to pause – TAKE TIME. Be proud of what you’ve achieved; the friends you’ve made, the fun you’ve had, the struggles you’ve overcome, all that you’ve learned.

A few moments of reflection can really help you to be aware of where you are, and create a new horizon. Making use of the range of services available through the Career Zone after graduation can help you to clarify your next journey and support you to reach your next goal.

Some of you may be feeling completely lost about what you want to do, and seeing friends advancing with clear plans while you may be heading home can feel quite isolating.  Fast Forward provides a full list of careers-related services available to everyone long after graduation.  You can book onto our career webinars if there is anything you want to catch up on, as well as gain support from finding work, to helping you to work out what you want to do next.  You can book 1:1 Careers Appointments to discuss your circumstances over Skype, Phone or face to face – a chat with a Careers Consultant can certainly help you stay connected and keep you on track.

*tick tock tick tock*

If you’ve planned to take some time out, perhaps travelling for a season, we can still support you via Skype, no matter the TIME ZONE, and even help you to find graduate opportunities abroad, or make plans for your return.

For those of you that may be anxious that your ideal plans haven’t yet come to fruition; be assured that we are still available to support you. I’m a firm believer in the word ‘yet’.  If you feel you’ve failed, change your perspective… you just haven’t reached your goal yet!  You can still have applications and CVs reviewed via Skype with the Career Zone, and talk to a Careers Consultant about targeting different employers or different types of work if your goals have changed.  You are still eligible to make use of The eXepert scheme which can put you in contact with University alumni to get advice on how to enter a chosen sector, occupation or company; extending your professional network.  So stay resilient, and remember that a detour to reach the summit can sometimes offer the best views!  You still have PLENTY OF TIME!

Finally, if you’re keen to prepare for your new job and want to do some personal development before you start, then making good use of My Career Zone Digital offers some excellent online training.  There is also support on creating your LinkedIn profile, and developing your professional networks.

So no matter quite where you are on your career journey, we have a range of opportunities available. Let us help you reach your destination, ONE STEP AT A TIME!

Chicken ‘n’ Blue Chip

Think your part-time job doesn’t relate to your wider career plan? Think again. As Emily Quartly (final year, BSc Economics and Finance) found out, it’s all about transferable skills. 

Emily Quartly

Being a student is tough enough with baked beans for breakfast, lunch and dinner, let alone trying to fund yourself through the nights out and long days on campus and extortionate student housing.

For me, I’ve always worked with the mentality that earning my own money is the best way to guarantee funding for what I want to do. I’ve worked in Nando’s since I was 16 and kept up the part-time job throughout school and University. Nando’s is a great company to work for, the hours were flexible, and everyone I met was hard working and continued to contribute to the growth and success of the restaurant. I never really thought about what Nando’s had given me beyond a payslip and a good Christmas party until I started working in a more corporate environment.

“I was chatting to a senior manager about my progress and he continually highlighted the fact that I was very approachable…He wasn’t surprised by my history in restaurant waitressing and even said that it’s those kinds of student jobs that give you the best skills.”

Being an intern you’re told the biggest thing to work on is networking. Networking is another term in my head for a good chat and interactions with each other, which is actually the basis of my waitress job. Interacting with customers, colleagues, managers, and trainees was all key to my student job, especially when it came to handling complaints and general challenges and changes seen in restaurant life.

On my last day of my internship with an investment bank I was chatting to a senior manager about my progress and he continually highlighted the fact that I was very approachable and easy to talk to and get along with. Bearing in mind I had spent the best part of 10 hours a day with the team for 5 weeks, it’s so valuable to be recognised as a team member even as an intern.

He wasn’t surprised by my history in restaurant waitressing and even said that it’s those kinds of student jobs that give you the best skills and my transferable skills necessary to progress other areas of career interest.

“If you’re thinking of taking a job while studying I would highly recommend; it may prove much more valuable to your skill set in the future than you ever thought.”

I couldn’t agree with him more now! After nearly 4 years I left a great restaurant and joined the Career Zone team, which although a very different job, still gives me networking opportunities and the chance to write pieces like this for other students.

I really enjoy working and having some time in the week for something that is special to me and a completely separate focus to my university studies. It teaches you loads of time management, organisation, confidence and integrity as you’re faced with new situations at every turn.

If you’re thinking of taking a job while studying I would highly recommend; it may prove much more valuable to your skill set in the future than you ever thought. As for me, I’ll be starting a graduate role at BNP Paribas in September.

Find your part-time job here…

Marion Milne – Director, Writer, Producer

It’s Never Too Late… helps final-year Humanities students get advice from successful Exeter alumni, and showcases opportunities from the Career Zone.

Marion Milne is a Documentary Film Maker as well as an Emmy Nominated Director, Writer, Series Producer and award winning Producer. She graduated from Exeter with a BA in French and Drama in 1979.  Read about a day in her life filming one of her most recent documentaries about Martin Luther King.

This photo was taken last summer while shooting in America on a documentary for ITV about Martin Luther King.

Marion Milne and camera man on location in Memphis, Tennessee

We were in Memphis, Tennessee, and I’m directing from the back seat, while my camera man is in the front seat wielding the camera.

The reason we are filming in this way is that our presenter, Sir Trevor McDonald, has finished shooting for the day, and we are picking up what are called Point of View shots (POVs).

We’re inside a gorgeous 1955 Cadillac (from the Martin Luther King era) because we wanted to add a period feel to the documentary. We also used lots of music from the time. While shooting, with our driver, we covered many miles in the American South in the Cadillac, taking Sir Trevor from place to place of relevance to the Civil Rights Era.

It’s standard practice in TV (and even in feature films) to shoot the POV shots separately. So you film with the presenter (or the actor) to capture them sitting inside the car, you film something called ‘up and pasts’ to see them go past in the vehicle from outside the car, and then the last thing you do are the POV shots – as if the camera is seeing what the presenter is seeing.

Sometimes we get caught out. If you shoot everything in sunshine and then the POVs later in the day when it’s getting dark, the Editor (whose job it is to cut it all together) is most unimpressed. Ditto for rain!

Day to day shoots like this one are a combination of hard work and great fun. You get access to places you might never otherwise go to, and meet people you might not otherwise meet.

On the Martin Luther King shoot we interviewed his God Daughter and some of the brave people who marched alongside him in the Civil Rights Marches.

We learnt some amazing new facts. For example Martin Luther King never planned to say “I have a dream” in his famous March on Washington in August 1963. The truth is he was slightly running out of steam in the speech when a singer called Mahalia Jackson called out ‘tell them about the dream Martin, tell them about the dream’.

We also interviewed Martin Luther King’s secretary who typed up his words for the March on Washington. ‘That’s not the speech’’she said ‘that’s not the speech we stayed up all night typing’.

Sir Trevor McDonald, OBE

Another funny incident on the shoot was when we were in New York interviewing Harry Belafonte, the legendary singer who was also part of the Civil Rights movement.

We picked a location on the Upper East Side inside a building that is normally very quiet. When we got there, to our horror, there were construction workers outside, drilling. They were basically digging up the road and needed to get the job done that day. So much noise the interview would be impossible.

I spoke to the foreman, who was African American, and explained the problem. ‘For Mr Belafonte’ he said ‘we’ll stop drilling’.

When Harry Belafonte arrived (bearing in mind he is ninety) he happily posed for photos with all the construction workers as a thank you.  And true to their word, they stopped drilling as a thank you.

When we got back to the U.K. we had one more celebrity to track down. Naomi Campbell – who was also an honorary Godchild to Nelson Mandela – is a champion of Martin Luther King. When we learnt that one of the world’s most famous Super Models was keen to be interviewed for our documentary, we cleared our schedules and set up camp in the Dorchester Hotel during a brief break in Naomi’s busy day.

We learnt that Naomi was in her way to a Vogue shoot and would need at least two hours with her stylist and make-up artist before she appeared.

We waited on tenterhooks. Super Models are not really known for their punctuality and our window of opportunity was narrowing as the minutes ticked by.

Then, just when we had given up hope, the phone rang. ‘You’ve got fifteen minutes’ barked one of Naomi’s minders down the phone. In swept Naomi. In swept her entourage.

We were poised, waiting ready to roll. Naomi – looking amazing – gracefully sat down, switched off her phone and took off her sunglasses.

Action’ I said.

Ten minutes later we had our scoop. Naomi on MLK.  ‘He was fearless’ she said. ‘He lived what he said, breathed what he said, did what he said. His name will never be erased from the history books. Martin Luther King will never be forgotten’.

And with that she was gone. Bravo Naomi. Bravo Martin Luther King.

You can find out Marion’s Top Tips about how to gain a career in her sector: here.

Top Resources from My Career Zone Digital for Graduates

Marie Johns graduated in BA Philosophy and Sociology from Exeter in 2017. She’s currently the Survey Project Officer (GBP) here at the University. 

Marie Johns, Survey Project Officer (GBP) and Exeter alumn

During my final year at Exeter, I was pleased to discover that the Career Zone is available to graduates for three years after graduation. I’ve certainly been taking advantage ever since!

In particular, online resources from new platform My Career Zone Digital have been extremely useful in helping me to understand what I want from a job, make successful applications, and ultimately secure employment. Since starting my job, I have enjoyed browsing the resources available for graduates who have entered the workplace. Below, I have compiled a list of my favourite resources from My Career Zone Digital, for graduates at any stage of their career journey.

The Elevator Pitch Builder is a great tool to get you used to talking about yourself by teaching you how to create an effective professional summary. Not only does this help you to develop self-awareness of your strengths and ambitions, but it will help you to talk confidently about yourself in applications and interviews.

The Employer Advice section of My Career Zone Digital contains a number of useful videos covering a range of topics. I found the Job Hunting videos well worth watching. As a recent graduate, I was new to job-hunting and the world of full-time work. It was therefore interesting to hear experienced employers talk informally about which attributes they look for in a new employee and think about how I could demonstrate these to make a good impression.

I found the Interview Simulator to be a really useful tool for interview preparation as it includes many examples of questions you might be asked, grouped into categories. The fact that it allows you to record yourself giving answers enables self-evaluation and improvement and also helps you to build confidence in answering a variety of questions. I also like that there is a way of testing yourself and rehearsing a real interview by having a mock interview which you can either take without knowing the questions beforehand, or create yourself.

My Career Zone Digital

The IT Skills Courses are a great way to brush up on those Microsoft Office skills you haven’t used since GSCE! You can set the course to fit your preferred level of ability (beginner or intermediate) and you have the choice to either actively participate in the tutorials, or to simply watch videos of someone else performing the tasks. My current role involves a lot of work on Excel, which I’d not used extensively before, and I found this course was the ideal way to increase my confidence for the tasks required of me.

The Career Skills Section is great for those, like me, who are in work. There are lots of resources available under sub-headings such as Balancing Work and Life, Being More Productive and Improving Workplace Skills which I have often drawn upon to help me adjust to everyday workplace challenges. It is great to know that these resources are available to me as my career progresses over the next three years.

My Career Zone Digital is there to support you whatever you’re doing now or hope to be doing in the future. There is also a new weekly newsletter you can sign up to which means you can keep up-to-date with new content that’s added.

I fully recommend that you take advantage of these resources just as I have. Good luck!

Working for a Startup

Kellie Wragg graduated from the University of Exeter in 2016 with a degree in Business Management, and then in 2017 with a Masters in International Management. She is currently an Account Manager at HeadBox. 

Kellie Wragg, Exeter alumn and HeadBox Account Manager

During my final years at Exeter I used the Career Zone a lot to get some helpful advice about what my steps should be after my university career was over. They were really helpful and I would definitely recommend paying them a visit if anyone is finding their next steps daunting.

I wasn’t sure which industry I wanted to work in, but knew it was best to get as much experience as possible. Soon enough, I started working for an Estate Agency in London as a member of their Sales department. Although this role taught me a lot and was a great experience, I knew it wasn’t for me. The company themselves was fairly large and the processes they had set up were rigid and very set in stone. I didn’t like the feeling of being just another employee to them and having to stick to outdated and rigid terms. So, I decided to start looking for something else. That’s when I came across HeadBox.

“Being part of startup is always exciting and there are constant developments and new things to learn.”

HeadBox is the UK’s first SaaS enabled marketplace for creative venue and event spaces. The website was the first of its kind that allows you to instantly search, book and pay for a quirky venue online, which was a very exciting concept for the events industry. The more I looked into the company, the more interesting it sounded so I applied for a position as one of their Account Managers. I went through their interview process and eventually landed myself the role in the budding technology start-up. Working for a startup is a great experience, and one that comes with many positive aspects. Here are just a few reasons why I think working for a startup is the right step after you graduate.

Making an Impact

When you work for a smaller company or startup, there’s a lot more room for you to get your voice heard. As you’ll be working in a fairly small team it means each person has the chance to contribute and share their ideas from the beginning. This makes a huge difference to not only your confidence in the workplace but your ability to present your ideas to managers and peers. You can feel real ownership over your successes and how your work impacts a company as a whole. It really makes you feel like all your working efforts are making an impact on the success of the company, which is great.

The Startup Journey

Being part of a company during its adolescence is an invaluable experience, and an exciting one. You’ll definitely learn tonnes about the department you work in, but you’ll also get to work very closely with other departments and see how they work together to make the company great. For example, you may sit right next door to the marketing or finance team which means you can get a great insight into how your role affects them and vice versa. This is something you don’t always get in a larger company. Being part of startup is always exciting and there are constant developments and new things to learn.

Sociable Startups

The third benefit of working for a startup is the social aspect. You’ll usually find yourself surrounded by a group of other recent graduates who all share the same enthusiasm for making their way up the career ladder. Although there’s lots of hard work to do, there’s also a great sense of team spirit which makes it a relaxed environment to work in. You can constantly bounce ideas off of your colleagues and ask them for help and advice.

Progression

Finally, I think that being part of a startup company gives you a lot of opportunities for fast progression through a company. A successful startup grows pretty fast, and if you’ve made a good impression, you’ll be climbing up the ranks a lot quicker than at a larger corporate firm. There will be plenty of opportunities for you, and possibilities to see yourself moving from executive to manager within 6 months.

There are plenty of other benefits to working for a startup, the rewards really are endless and I would highly recommend it to any graduate who is looking to kick start their career.

James Priday – From Undergrad to CEO

James Priday graduated from the University of Exeter in 2011, and is currently the MD at Prydis Wealth and CEO of P1 Investment Management

James Priday, MD at Prydis Wealth, and CEO of P1 Investment Management

After graduating with a First in BA Accounting and Finance, I was invited by the University to stay on for a year to complete a Masters in the same subject and to teach undergraduate accountancy. This meant I could not only get a free Masters degree, but I would also be paid to teach at a University – fantastic at 21 years old! This was an opportunity I therefore enthusiastically took up. However, I had to give up a position in the Corporate Finance team at EY which I had already been offered. This was a decision that I didn’t take lightly but is one I now know was very much the right thing for me to do. At that point I didn’t know if I wanted a career at a big firm, or if I wanted to find my own path; either within smaller companies or my own business. Either way, both degrees would set me up very well for the future.

“I genuinely believe that the base knowledge, skills, and contacts I made at Exeter were the springboard to all of the things I have gone on to do.”

While at University I had also set up my own business developing fitness products. I did this with the help of the University’s Innovation Centre (now Think, Try, Do). The skills I learnt through that process have proved invaluable.

I have to admit; I didn’t have the usual University life. The social side didn’t interest me much, and I was more focused on getting ahead in life. That was far more important to me at that stage. Because of this, I was also completing professional qualifications alongside my degree, and before I had finished at Uni, I was qualified as an investment manager with the Chartered Institute for Securities and Investment (CISI), and as a financial adviser with the Chartered Insurance Institute (CII).

When I came to finishing the Masters, it had become clear to me that I needed to have full control over my future, and therefore a career at a big firm was not for me. I had a conversation with my father and brother that would change the course of my life.

My brother had just come out of PWC as a Chartered Tax Adviser and started working with my father, who had a small accountancy and financial advisory business. We as a family took the decision that my brother would take over the accountancy firm, and I would take over the financial advisory side, allowing my father to step back from the day-to-day business operations, and enable us to inject some fresh energy and ideas into the business.

We quickly rebranded the firm, and set-up a law firm to complement our accountancy and financial advisory activities. This was only possible because the rules changed in 2012, allowing non-lawyers to own a law firm. During this time I also obtained regulatory permission for the financial advisory business to manage investments. These two developments allowed us to serve clients internally across a number of areas, which was, and I believe still is, something unique in the UK. The new group is called Prydis.

Since 2012, we have grown the business six-fold, with 75 staff and four offices. I have also moved our investment management activities into a separate company, P1 Investment Management. P1 serves not only our clients, but also the clients of other financial advisory firms. Additionally, I have developed a consumer-facing online investment platform, Strawberry Invest, and a new financial advisory offering, Financial Solutions.

Life has turned complicated, but exciting and rewarding. I genuinely believe that the base knowledge, skills, and contacts I made at Exeter University were the springboard to all of the things I have gone on to do.

If Plan A doesn’t work out, there are 25 more letters in the alphabet…

Katie Thick graduated from the University of Exeter with a BA in Geography in 2017. Katie talked to us about life after University, applying for a Graduate Business Partnership, and how she plans to take her career forward.

You can read the magazine here Ex.ac.uk/itz or get a paper copy from The Career Zone. 

Katie Thick, Exeter alum and ‘In the Zone’ Editor

My time at Exeter was a rocky road and didn’t quite go to plan. During my final year I prioritised my academic studies and didn’t have a work-life balance. My mind-set was glued to studying, meaning I hardly had time to enjoy being a student, let alone think of career ideas. Unfortunately my health deteriorated and I had to take an interruption from my studies. At this point I thought I’d failed. Upon my return to Exeter, and having finally completed my degree, I reflected on how my time out from University had benefitted me massively.

For the past year I had dipped my toes into various retail and customer facing roles. I enjoyed working with my colleagues, however I struggled with the repetitive nature of the role and was eager to progress my career…

“I really enjoyed writing the magazine and adding my own wellbeing/holistic twist. The magazine features an array of student case studies and supportive services to help current students and recent graduates with any career-related challenges.”

My GBP role has been fantastic. I have a passion to work in Higher Education and wanted to learn about the behind the scenes work at the University. My placement was in the Career Zone where I was tasked to produce the latest edition of the ‘In the Zone’ magazine. I really enjoyed writing the magazine and adding my own wellbeing/holistic twist which I hope will bring comfort to those students who currently feel in limbo with career plans. The magazine features an array of student case studies and supportive services to help current students and recent graduates with any career-related challenges. I’ve used my own experience of a less ‘traditional’ University path to help guide anyone who may be feeling a little lost. Believe me, it’s okay to feel lost and it’s okay to take time to gain confidence and become more self-aware.

Initially I had applied for various roles in Higher Education across the South West before successfully applying for the GBP. I was fortunate to have been selected for various interviews, but struggled to take that final step and be successfully appointed to the role. Remaining resilient and eager to learn I asked for feedback from each and every employer, to which majority answered ‘lack of experience’. I was disheartened by the job rejections and felt employers were not willing to give me the experience I needed.

“I learnt it’s really important not to take things to heart, but in your stride. Knock backs are tests; we fall but come back stronger.”

During my placement I’ve continued to make use of the Career Zone as both an employee and as a graduate. Did you know that the Career Zone are there to support you up to three years after graduating? I decided to attend the Personal Resilience session as I had felt I needed to learn how to manage career stresses more effectively. I learnt it’s really important not to take things to heart, but in your stride. Knock backs are tests; we fall but come back stronger. So keep trying and keep persevering, make the most of each challenge or task you face, because one day it will be your day to succeed.

Empathy, Resilience and Organisation – A Career in Education

It’s Never Too Late… helps final-year Humanities students get advice from successful Exeter alumni, and showcases opportunities from the Career Zone.

Lizzie Carter is currently working as a Key Stage 5 Achievement Coordinator at a grammar school and graduated from Exeter with a BA in English in 2012. Find out how she went from primary school teacher, to Ministry of Justice clerk, and back into the education sector. 

Elizabeth Carter, Exeter Alumn and current Key Stage 5 Achievement Coordinator

“After graduation, I had a ‘roller coaster’ career. I knew I wanted to go into education since being inspired by my former English teachers, and I was certain that job satisfaction was highly important to me. Feeling perhaps too young to teach teenagers, I went straight into a Primary PGCE and became a Junior school teacher for 3 years. This was a rewarding but demanding experience. Desperate to gain an insight into a profession outside the classroom, I took a leap of faith and gained a role with the Ministry of Justice as a High Court Judge’s clerk. When not commuting to London, I travelled across the country with my Judge sitting in on criminal trials and working with esteemed lawyers; an incredible experience. After 18 months, and being a little older and wiser, I knew I wanted to get back into education. So now I have returned to my old Grammar school where I studied for my GCSEs and A Levels (a surreal yet wonderful change of events!).

“The freedom I have in my role is fantastic as I manage my own workload and am moulding the position into my ideal job.”

My current role is titled ‘Key Stage 5 Achievement Coordinator’ which means I support sixth-formers by resolving pastoral issues, monitoring attendance, organising enrichment events and helping with career choices and university applications. As I have QTS, I also teach A Level Sociology, EPQ and am a mentor for GCSE English students. The freedom I have in my role is fantastic as I manage my own workload and am moulding the position into my ideal job! My days are never the same as it is very much student-led, so it can become quite hectic but brings an enormous amount of satisfaction – something I missed when employed by the court service.

The recruitment process for jobs in education – particularly teaching – is very rigorous with a formal interview, set tasks, a tour of the school (sometimes by students) and most of the time you’re asked to deliver a lesson in which you’re observed. Although it’s a daunting process and you know that everything you do is being scrutinised, you’re working out if the school is right for you as much as senior staff are assessing you as a potential employee. I would say that if you enjoy the day as a whole, it generally means that you and the school are a good fit. In both jobs I’ve had in education, I’ve been contacted on the same day as the interview with the outcome and feedback. This is a standard process in the sector and is real a positive as it means that you’re not waiting by the phone for days on end.

Undergraduate study definitely prepared me for a career in education because I can share anecdotes with students about my own time at university, singing Exeter’s praises in the process. What’s more, completing a dissertation allows me to offer research advice and referencing tips to my students writing their EPQ projects. My second-year module ‘English in the Workplace’ meant that I secured an 80-hour placement in a school. This counted as academic credit alongside submitting a reflective portfolio (which included an essay on the issue of equality in education). I also delivered a presentation to my peers and first-year students to describe my experience. I believe this module was a real asset when applying for my postgraduate course and subsequent jobs.

“I believe I’m a walking example of someone who thought they knew what career they wanted, and still do, but have followed a peculiar pathway before arriving.”

In order to succeed in education, I would say you need empathy, resilience and good organisational skills as working in a school never has its dull moments and keeps you on your toes! More importantly, you really need to have a lifelong desire for learning as this inspires students to achieve their potential and be as committed (as clichéd as it may sound). Working with sixth formers has motivated me to seriously consider applying for the MA Education online course at Exeter; something I would probably never have considered had I entered a different profession.

Ultimately, I hope to progress to becoming an English teacher within the department at my school and eventually gain a leadership post. Everything has come full circle which has been very strange but fulfilling. I believe I am a walking example of someone who thought they knew what career they wanted, and still do, but have followed a peculiar pathway before arriving. Between finishing my degree and gaining the job I have now, I have acquired a range of skills and confirmed that education is the right sector for me by testing the waters elsewhere. Even if I could, I would not change my journey as the life experience – and couple of grey hairs – I bring to the classroom enriches both my pedagogy and my students’ learning.”

If you want to access more bespoke resources, have a look at our intranet pages and connect with the College of Humanities on Facebook and Twitter.

Professional Pathways

Rachel Dean is Employability and Work Placement Support Assistant (STEM) based on the Streatham Campus. 

Rachel Dean, Employability and Work Placement Support Assistant (STEM)

Looking for a paid internship this summer? Interested in getting an insight into an industry through tailored training? Then Professional Pathways is perfect for you.

Professional Pathways are unique programmes, during which students receive a week’s training from industry experts, and a paid internship in highly sought after industries. Following on from last year’s successful programmes, we are expanding our offering to cover 7 sectors:

All the Professional Pathway programmes will be delivered at the same time. The training will be delivered over either 4 or 5 days between the 18 and 22 June, with the internships taking place the following week.

The Pathways are delivered on either the Streatham campus or the Penryn campus, but are all open to students from either campus. They are open to any student, studying any course at any level.

Pathways 2018

Why do a Pathway?

There are many benefits to undertaking a Professional Pathway, but one of the main ones has to be the chance to gain paid experience in sectors that tend to be hard to break in to – this experience will help you stand out when applying for jobs in the future.

In addition, the training is also an exceptional opportunity to network with and learn from professionals currently working in the field, who can tell you what you really need to know in order to succeed in the sector.

A previous student who undertook the Pathway to International Trade summed it up best when she said, “I’ve enjoyed this programme immensely. I not only gained knowledge but additionally friends, network contacts, and a real understanding of the industry.”

How do I Apply?  

Applying for a Pathway is a useful activity on its own, as it will give you valuable experience that will help when you come to apply for other internships or graduate jobs.

The process has two stages:

  1. The application form. This form will ask you to answer four questions, including questions such as what you hope to gain from taking part in the Pathway, and what qualities you have that make you suitable for the programme.
    The best applications stand out because they contain lots of detail and passion for the sector – there is no word limit so take advantage of the space to really show us why you are interested and how the Pathway links to what you love.
  2. The assessment centre. Lots of employers use assessment centres to decide on candidates for both internships and graduate jobs, so this is a perfect opportunity to get some practice in!
    We will shortlist applicants based on their application forms and then invite the shortlist to an assessment centre that will be tailored to each specific Pathway. The assessment centre will involve four tasks that you will be asked to complete, involving tasks in small groups as well as some individual tasks. As you complete these tasks, you will be marked by an assessor to help us make the final decision on who to accept on to the programme.
    A top tip for succeeding at the assessment centre would be to make sure that you speak up and share your ideas with the group, but also ensure that you don’t talk over others and control the discussion too much – you want to show teamwork skills, not just how brilliant your ideas are.

Applications for this year’s Professional Pathways are already open, so apply now on My Career Zone for the chance to take part in this fantastic programme.

Finding a Common Purpose

Natasha Lock is studying BA History, International Relations & Chinese at the University of Exeter, Streatham Campus. 

Natasha Lock

From the 5th-11th January 2018, I was lucky enough to be selected for the Common Purpose Programme hosted at the American University of Sharjah in the United Arab Emirates. Here, amongst 30 other students from Exeter, I was given an insight into leadership skills, the city of Sharjah and Emirati culture, and how to ensure that cities of the future are both inclusive and sustainable.

Boundaries are everywhere: between sectors, specialisations, geographies, generations, backgrounds and beliefs. Common Purpose aims to support future leaders who can work across these boundaries, who are therefore ultimately more likely to solve problems and create change. In the ever competitive world for graduates seeking employment, it is no longer enough to rely solely on one’s IQ. Common Purpose aims to show the importance of having EQ (Emotional Intelligence) – the ability to connect with people on a social level, and CQ (Cultural Intelligence) – the ability to work with people that are not like you. It demonstrates the necessity of being able to successfully lead people of a different culture, race, age, gender and religion.

Common Purpose students at the American University of Sharjah

The programme was hosted over four days and provided ice-breakers, pitching sessions, guest speaker sessions, trips to businesses and debates. On the penultimate day, we were arranged into groups of six and asked to design a product that would help Sharjah to become a more inclusive and smart city. We were given 24 hours to come up with an idea, design a poster, make a video, produce a written outline of our concept and finally give a 3 minute pitch to three senior members of local companies followed by a Q&A session. I found this particularly memorable, not only because of my wonderful group who worked so well together, but also because of the incredible ideas that every other group developed in such a short space of time.

“Common Purpose aims to support future leaders who can work across boundaries, and who are therefore ultimately more likely to solve problems and create change.”

Common Purpose programmes are based on the idea that cross boundary leaders need to experience the world and the people around them. With this in mind, the programme organised visits to four start-up businesses in both Dubai and Sharjah. Here, we were able to meet with both local and international entrepreneurs and get some insights into the core skills required to start your own business, the most important being resilience. Despite the difference from business to business all of the entrepreneurs agreed that starting your own company is undoubtedly the best way to get a grasp and understanding of enterprise, corporate structures and themselves.

Aside from the programme, we had the opportunity to explore Sharjah and Dubai in our free time. We quad-biked in the Al Qudra desert, went up the tallest building in the world and went to the world’s largest aquarium. Every Common Purpose trip takes place in a different city – previous trips have been located in Nairobi, Kuala Lumpur, Philadelphia and Melbourne – allowing for the unparalleled opportunity to explore a city on a scholarship funded trip.

The Burj Khalifa, the tallest structure in the world

The Common Purpose trip to the American University of Sharjah was a huge learning experience and one that I will value throughout my academic and career progression.

For students reading this and wondering how they can enhance their enterprise skills and employability, here would be my two recommendations:

Local: Get involved with Think Try Do at Exeter University! The team offer sessions to enhance enterprise skills and provide support to students who are engaging with their own entrepreneurial activity. You can find a list of their current sessions and more information on the following link: https://mycareerzone.exeter.ac.uk/workgroups/student-enterprise-support

Global: Apply for the Common Purpose trips! This is a great way of networking with like-minded people, building on your soft skills and having a taster of life in a different city. You can find more information about Common Purpose here: http://commonpurpose.org