Sprint – The Groundbreaking Career Development Programme

Sprint is designed for undergraduate women of all ages, from all backgrounds and stages in their lives and study to develop their potential and address study and career issues. 

Rosanna – Psychology student and Sprint participant

Applications are now open for Sprint so we caught up with a previous participant – Rosanna – to hear about her experiences of the programme.

“I’m a Psychology student here at Exeter. I decided to apply for Sprint as I knew I needed to gain valuable skills to help me in my future career. Being a Psychology student, the career options seemed endless, and I didn’t know where I wanted to go with my degree. However, Sprint teaches you skills for any profession, which was something that was really important to me.

I wanted to apply for Sprint as I hadn’t had any previous training on creating a personal brand, networking and identifying my own skill-sets. The knowledge Sprint gives you really is comprehensive. In addition, I think it’s great that you learn in a female-only environment, as we get to tackle issues that predominantly affect women in the workplace

Sprint helped me when it came to self-confidence, as it taught me how to find my own strengths. This helped me in interviews, and I have now secured a graduate job in Accounting. 

In the long-term, Sprint gives you a sense of confidence in the world of careers. You are given amazing advice by professionals, as well as a folder full of information to take away and review at any time. 

In the short term, Sprint allows you to meet many like-minded and driven individuals, and take time out from studying to just focus on you and your future career. 

If anyone is unsure of applying, just go for it! Yes, you need to take a few days off studying, but it is so worth it, and will really compliment the rest of your time at university. You’re still learning on Sprint, but learning about things perhaps no one has said to you before. Don’t miss the opportunity and never end up learning these things.” 

The Sprint webpage has more information about the course, including how to apply. If you have any questions, please contact Rachel Sloan or ask us a question via My Career Zone.

The Career Mentor Scheme, a Career-Changing Experience

Rebecca Lenthall is the Career Mentoring and Internships Coordinator, based on the Streatham Campus. 

Rebecca Lenthall, Career Mentoring and Internships Coordinator

Working for the Career Zone, we’re in the fortunate position to get that ‘aww, I’ve helped somebody today’ feeling pretty much every day in the office, but every now and then you receive an email from a student or graduate that upgrades that feeling to a full-blown case of the warm and fuzzies!

In bleak early January, we received this email from a graduate who had benefitted from the Career Mentor Scheme during her time at Exeter, and two years or so later, she took the time to get in touch again and let us know just how much she feels it helped her out. Now to let her do the talking…

“I am an MSc Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture alumna (2014-2015) and I applied to the Career Mentor Scheme in November 2015 when I was doing an internship with a local food marketing company in Torquay (I was able to obtain this internship thanks to the Career Zone).

My mentor had had an amazing career developing a publication so successful that it was sold to the Informa group. Publishing has been an ongoing dream of mine and I have always enjoyed researching, writing and communicating insights in accessible terms. Since my mentor had a relationship with Informa, she was able to help me “get my foot in the door” with them. That resulted in my first publishing contract ever. That was a thrilling experience that has improved the confidence I have in the commercial value of my work. Furthermore, I had a positive experience with my first publishing contract with Informa and that resulted in the publication of an additional two reports.

“My mentoring experience was a fantastic opportunity that has contributed to my self-esteem, my negotiation skills and the belief in my ability to reach any goal I set my mind to. My mentor was incredibly generous with her time and knowledge and she has made a lasting impact on me.”

This continued to give me the confidence boost that I needed in the beginning of my career. I am now a PhD student in Spain and plan to pursue a management consultant career in sustainability issues when I graduate. My mentoring experience was a fantastic opportunity that beyond the publishing contracts, has contributed to my self-esteem, my negotiation skills and the belief in my ability to reach any goal I set my mind to. My mentor was incredibly generous with her time and knowledge and she has made a lasting impact on me.”

This graduate’s story really showcases just how much of a positive impact a Career Mentor can have on your future career and indeed, your personal development. It really does have the potential to provide an insight like no other and to give you that boost of confidence that is sometimes just what’s needed in order to find the inspiration to fill in another application form.

The deadline for applying to the May – October 2018 Career Mentor Scheme has now been extended to Monday 26th March (final years graduating in summer 2018 are also very welcome to apply). We really hope the lovely story above will inspire you to have glance at the mentor profiles on My Career Zone and submit an application for a mentor of your own.

Professional Pathways

Rachel Dean is Employability and Work Placement Support Assistant (STEM) based on the Streatham Campus. 

Rachel Dean, Employability and Work Placement Support Assistant (STEM)

Looking for a paid internship this summer? Interested in getting an insight into an industry through tailored training? Then Professional Pathways is perfect for you.

Professional Pathways are unique programmes, during which students receive a week’s training from industry experts, and a paid internship in highly sought after industries. Following on from last year’s successful programmes, we are expanding our offering to cover 7 sectors:

All the Professional Pathway programmes will be delivered at the same time. The training will be delivered over either 4 or 5 days between the 18 and 22 June, with the internships taking place the following week.

The Pathways are delivered on either the Streatham campus or the Penryn campus, but are all open to students from either campus. They are open to any student, studying any course at any level.

Pathways 2018

Why do a Pathway?

There are many benefits to undertaking a Professional Pathway, but one of the main ones has to be the chance to gain paid experience in sectors that tend to be hard to break in to – this experience will help you stand out when applying for jobs in the future.

In addition, the training is also an exceptional opportunity to network with and learn from professionals currently working in the field, who can tell you what you really need to know in order to succeed in the sector.

A previous student who undertook the Pathway to International Trade summed it up best when she said, “I’ve enjoyed this programme immensely. I not only gained knowledge but additionally friends, network contacts, and a real understanding of the industry.”

How do I Apply?  

Applying for a Pathway is a useful activity on its own, as it will give you valuable experience that will help when you come to apply for other internships or graduate jobs.

The process has two stages:

  1. The application form. This form will ask you to answer four questions, including questions such as what you hope to gain from taking part in the Pathway, and what qualities you have that make you suitable for the programme.
    The best applications stand out because they contain lots of detail and passion for the sector – there is no word limit so take advantage of the space to really show us why you are interested and how the Pathway links to what you love.
  2. The assessment centre. Lots of employers use assessment centres to decide on candidates for both internships and graduate jobs, so this is a perfect opportunity to get some practice in!
    We will shortlist applicants based on their application forms and then invite the shortlist to an assessment centre that will be tailored to each specific Pathway. The assessment centre will involve four tasks that you will be asked to complete, involving tasks in small groups as well as some individual tasks. As you complete these tasks, you will be marked by an assessor to help us make the final decision on who to accept on to the programme.
    A top tip for succeeding at the assessment centre would be to make sure that you speak up and share your ideas with the group, but also ensure that you don’t talk over others and control the discussion too much – you want to show teamwork skills, not just how brilliant your ideas are.

Applications for this year’s Professional Pathways are already open, so apply now on My Career Zone for the chance to take part in this fantastic programme.

Finding a Common Purpose

Natasha Lock is studying BA History, International Relations & Chinese at the University of Exeter, Streatham Campus. 

Natasha Lock

From the 5th-11th January 2018, I was lucky enough to be selected for the Common Purpose Programme hosted at the American University of Sharjah in the United Arab Emirates. Here, amongst 30 other students from Exeter, I was given an insight into leadership skills, the city of Sharjah and Emirati culture, and how to ensure that cities of the future are both inclusive and sustainable.

Boundaries are everywhere: between sectors, specialisations, geographies, generations, backgrounds and beliefs. Common Purpose aims to support future leaders who can work across these boundaries, who are therefore ultimately more likely to solve problems and create change. In the ever competitive world for graduates seeking employment, it is no longer enough to rely solely on one’s IQ. Common Purpose aims to show the importance of having EQ (Emotional Intelligence) – the ability to connect with people on a social level, and CQ (Cultural Intelligence) – the ability to work with people that are not like you. It demonstrates the necessity of being able to successfully lead people of a different culture, race, age, gender and religion.

Common Purpose students at the American University of Sharjah

The programme was hosted over four days and provided ice-breakers, pitching sessions, guest speaker sessions, trips to businesses and debates. On the penultimate day, we were arranged into groups of six and asked to design a product that would help Sharjah to become a more inclusive and smart city. We were given 24 hours to come up with an idea, design a poster, make a video, produce a written outline of our concept and finally give a 3 minute pitch to three senior members of local companies followed by a Q&A session. I found this particularly memorable, not only because of my wonderful group who worked so well together, but also because of the incredible ideas that every other group developed in such a short space of time.

“Common Purpose aims to support future leaders who can work across boundaries, and who are therefore ultimately more likely to solve problems and create change.”

Common Purpose programmes are based on the idea that cross boundary leaders need to experience the world and the people around them. With this in mind, the programme organised visits to four start-up businesses in both Dubai and Sharjah. Here, we were able to meet with both local and international entrepreneurs and get some insights into the core skills required to start your own business, the most important being resilience. Despite the difference from business to business all of the entrepreneurs agreed that starting your own company is undoubtedly the best way to get a grasp and understanding of enterprise, corporate structures and themselves.

Aside from the programme, we had the opportunity to explore Sharjah and Dubai in our free time. We quad-biked in the Al Qudra desert, went up the tallest building in the world and went to the world’s largest aquarium. Every Common Purpose trip takes place in a different city – previous trips have been located in Nairobi, Kuala Lumpur, Philadelphia and Melbourne – allowing for the unparalleled opportunity to explore a city on a scholarship funded trip.

The Burj Khalifa, the tallest structure in the world

The Common Purpose trip to the American University of Sharjah was a huge learning experience and one that I will value throughout my academic and career progression.

For students reading this and wondering how they can enhance their enterprise skills and employability, here would be my two recommendations:

Local: Get involved with Think Try Do at Exeter University! The team offer sessions to enhance enterprise skills and provide support to students who are engaging with their own entrepreneurial activity. You can find a list of their current sessions and more information on the following link: https://mycareerzone.exeter.ac.uk/workgroups/student-enterprise-support

Global: Apply for the Common Purpose trips! This is a great way of networking with like-minded people, building on your soft skills and having a taster of life in a different city. You can find more information about Common Purpose here: http://commonpurpose.org

Your Future Starts Now

Albert Linney graduated from the University of Exeter in 2017 with a degree in Philosophy, Politics and Economics. He talked to us about life after Exeter, using the Career Zone to get ahead, and making the most of your time at Uni. 

Life is sweet for Albert after Exeter

Life is sweet for Albert after Exeter

What have you been up to since graduating in June?

I’ve always been fascinated by global economics so after graduation, I travelled around India and Sri Lanka for six weeks. It was an extremely informative experience, meeting so many amazing people along the way. It inspired me to work with emerging economies like India later in my professional career, though quite how, I’m not sure just yet.

I managed to bag a graduate job at a large multinational trading company as a Junior Agricultural Commodities Trader, but was also inspired during my philosophy modules to give writing a go so I’ve actually been doing some freelance remote blogging for a company called Cluboid. Studying a split focus degree like PPE just made me hungry to try all sorts of avenues to be honest. I’d always worried that selecting a degree would pigeonhole me, or mean I was only considered for one specific field, but it’s been quite the opposite. It seems to just have opened tonnes more doors.

“I’d always worried that selecting a degree would pigeonhole me, or mean I was only considered for one specific field, but it’s been quite the opposite.”

How did you find these opportunities?

Right from the start of my 3 years at Exeter, I made sure I was hooked up to the Career Zone email alerts – I was getting notified weekly with opportunities ranging from CV boosters to interview advice. The Career Zone was of particular help in preparation for the final round interviews for Graduate applications – conducting mock interviews was a massive help.

How did you prepare for the life of a graduate?

Whilst at university I was keen to keep myself occupied. This meant that when I wasn’t in lectures or the library, I participated in the French and Debating Societies, as well as in Boxing and the Officer Training Corps (A British Armed Forces initiative for Uni students to learn army-related skills and experience). I even acted as president of the PPE society where I was directly responsible for the running of a society consisting of over 100 members. During the summers, I’d occupy my time with internships. I found the continuation of work experience prepared me excellently for graduate job applications, because I was that much more accustomed to the business acumen and how to conduct myself in a professional environment.

How did your time at Exeter influence your future?

I owe a lot to my tutors, two of which stand out for me in particular. Firstly, Gary Abrahams was a great source of inspiration. Having been a huge economic success even in spite of the 2008 financial crash, I was so enamoured by his insights. His approach to the Economics of Financial Crises module was inspired, with a heavy focus on morality and changing behavioural standards in the finance world. Insight like that made me feel like I was approaching the field with something to give. Secondly, Lenny Moss – my Philosophical Anthropology lecturer – is an absolute expert in his field. He inspired me greatly towards further education. In fact, I’m currently in application for my masters in Politics and International Relations at Kings.

What would you tell your First Year self in retrospect?

I would have loved to have gotten more involved with the sporting side of Exeter – being one of the top sports Universities in the country. I’m pretty injury prone though, so I would have perhaps have told my first-year self to take rehab and physio more seriously. Maybe then I could have!

What has the future got in store for you?

I’m still intrigued by International Relations – a subset of politics. My dissertation focused on the North Korean nuclear situation and the Obama Administration so working for an NGO or political think-tank to address current issues such as this would be the big dream. Having said that, the nature of my course has made me hugely interested in so many different roles and areas, so quite honestly – who knows.

Getting Social Media to Work for You

Rachel Coombes is a Careers Consultant based on the Penryn Campus.

Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram – these are all social media platforms you use for fun, right? But have you also explored how they can help – or hinder – your job hunting? Here are my top 5 tips for how to go about making the most of Social Media when planning your career:

If this is your LinkedIn profile photo you're probably not doing social media right

If this is your LinkedIn profile photo you’re probably not doing social media right

  1. What Happens in Vegas stays on YouTube, Instagram, or Twitter…for everyone to see

We all know the importance of maintaining a good presence online, yet some people are still getting into problems with posts that they (or others) made. Remember, employers may check what information there is about you online before you join and have been known to withdraw offers based on what they find. So what can you do to protect yourself?

  • Make sure you lock down your privacy settings and regularly check these as they are often updated, meaning that things you thought you had secured may have become open to the public again.
  • Google yourself – check what is already online about you and do this regularly. Clear up anything you wouldn’t want anyone to see if they Googled you too.
  • Set up Google Alerts for your name to be informed about anything that is posted about you.
  • Always take a second to think about the effects anything you post may have before putting it online.
  1. Build Your Brand

Having a presence online can be a positive thing, and building your brand online can really help you get ahead of the game and stand out to employers for the right reasons. The more active you are on social media sites, the higher you’ll come in the Google rankings. Even just having a LinkedIn account (we’ll come on to that later) can help you get to the top of a Google search, so get involved.

  1. To Blog or Not to Blog…That is the Question

Blogs are easy to start up and one of the most popular and easy to use is Word Press. But how will blogging help you with your career? For a start you can use it to demonstrate your knowledge of certain areas, interest in a topic or skill sets. For example if you were interested in becoming a journalist your blog can show your writing ability. Or say if you wanted to get into marketing, you could blog about your views on various marketing strategies you’ve come across in the media, or any you had personally created. You can then add a link to it on your CV or LinkedIn account to demonstrate more about you. Make sure however that you update your blog regularly otherwise there’s no point.

  1. #Employers

They may stalk you online but you can also do the same, so get proactive.

  • Go to the employer’s website and find out which social media sites they use. Some may have separate sites for careers related information so always go onto the recruitment section of their website first to check.
  • If you like them on Facebook and follow them on Twitter you can then get regular updates on job openings/events/company information etc, all from the comfort of your phone.
  • YouTube can also be a great way to find out more about the company and the various roles within it from current employees or recent graduates. Some employers will also post clips on how to succeed in their recruitment process and what a group exercise might look like.
  • Interact with them – don’t be afraid to ask them a question or get involved in discussions. This can help to get you known to the employer so make sure this is for the right reasons. Make sure the questions you ask couldn’t easily be found out from their website or recruitment literature otherwise it will look like you haven’t done your research.
  1. We love LinkedIn

And we hope you will too. Feedback from students however is that a great number of you have LinkedIn accounts but aren’t sure how to make the most out of it. So here’s some key tips to help you get started:

  • Time – it can take some time to start reaping the rewards of LinkedIn so be patient and know that the more time and effort you put into it the more benefit you will get from it.
  • Research – you have access to millions of CVs in millions of different job roles through LinkedIn so get researching. Just type some key words of roles you’re interested in into the search bar at the top of LinkedIn and find the profiles of people involved in those areas. Have a look at how they got into it, what companies they’ve worked in, and build a greater knowledge of that industry.
  • Networking – start connecting with people. This can be other students, friends, contacts, employers you’ve met, work colleagues etc. They may not necessarily be connected to the area you want to get into but they may know someone who is. You can even search for particular companies and then find relevant people within that company you may like to approach. Make sure when you send out your request to connect that you change the generic text box and target it to that individual so they are more likely to connect with you.
  • Profile – LinkedIn will take you through the necessary steps to help you set this up and give you pointers on how to improve your profile. Just like your CV it should be targeted to the area you wish to get into. Make sure you detail clearly in your work history the skills and experience you have gained, including key words which employers may search for.
  • Groups – this is a great feature of LinkedIn and allows you to join groups that may be of interest to you. Doing this can help target your profile and enable you to participate in discussions and learn about certain areas. But which groups should you join? Search for ones related to your career area or previous experience. The University of Exeter has a group so why not start by joining that. Professional bodies and company specific groups can also be great ones to join.
  • Is it worth upgrading? There are a few benefits to getting the professional upgrade however the majority of what you need to do can be done without needing to upgrade so don’t feel you have to do this at this stage.
  • More, More, More – if you want to know more come along to one of our LinkedIn labs which will shortly be advertised on My Career Zone.

In summary Social Media is a great way to open up your job search and help you approach your job hunting in a more creative way. Not only can it help you access that all important hidden job market but it can also help you network and get yourself known to employers. Make the most of it as a resource and be sure to include it in your job hunting action plan.

To start on your social media journey why not come along to one of our ‘LinkedIn webinars’ or follow the Career Zone on social media to keep up to date with all things employability.

Happy Networking!

Networking for the Slightly Scared

Technology and social media have brought new dimensions to networking, but traditional social skills and motivation remain key elements of making successful connections. Mark Armitage, Careers Consultant, tells us how to master the dark art.

Attitudes to networking can vary from an utter dread of having to interact with a new person, to excitement at the possibilities that this can offer. Some see it as a spurious process of ingratiating others for personal gain, but it can be rewarding for both parties and is increasingly important in researching and attaining your ideal job.

Networking, not as scary as you think

Networking, not as scary as you think

If you don’t know what your ideal job looks like, the temptation is to procrastinate and be fatalistic. But networking can put you in control whereby you begin to interact and learn from others in roles that may interest you, and gain insights that never appeared in that careers booklet. Communicating with others in roles that interest you is a great start, and this can also be a gateway to work-shadowing and experience. Experience can help you understand what’s needed in a job and add to your CV to demonstrate skills and motivation.

“Remember that employers want to meet and network with you as the potential future of their organisation.”

It can be irritating to be told to network; you can’t force relationships, so where to start? The Career Zone resources can equip you with the basics of networking etiquette and our service offer a vast range of possibilities to meet and interact with people who can help you. For example, the eXepert scheme can enable you to contact Exeter alumni in fields of interest. There is also the Career Mentor Scheme; the opportunity to apply to have an Exeter alumnus to mentor and support you in a career area.

Exeter has great alumni and employer links and the range of people you can meet at careers fairs, presentations and skills sessions is immense. The important thing to remember is that employers want to meet and network with you as the potential future of their organisation, while alumni often wish to ‘give back’ to current students.

If you meet someone, treat it like a short but slightly less formal interview. Be ready to shake hands, make eye contact, smile naturally and be yourself. Ask informed and open questions about their role and the organisation, such as ‘How do you find working for…?’ Be prepared to talk and give some introduction about what stage you’re are at in your studies and your subject, but balance this with good listening skills and be attentive, interested and enthusiastic.

“Informal networking can happen anywhere, so consider your own immediate contacts and less obvious channels.”

Try not to take too much time if the person wants to meet other students, and don’t be too pushy or presumptuous. Employers may ask for your name and give you a business card. It’s a good idea to have your own business cards but use them sparingly and don’t shower people with your CV, however brilliant it may be.

If you have any sort of networking contact where you receive some help or insights remember to thank them. If you have a contact detail, a polite email of thanks could lead to further useful interaction or put you in a position to ask for work experience or further contacts. Employers at careers fairs and presentations will often make a note of your name. If you make a good impression, they may encourage you to apply and track your application. Remember that informal networking can sometimes happen anywhere and consider your own immediate contacts and less obvious channels.  An Exeter degree is not an access all areas pass, but the University is valued by employers and alumni and a great basis for your networking future.

Effective networking needs social skills and motivation to nurture relationships, combined with the appropriate use of new tools such as social media. This includes Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn, which can all contribute to your networking strategy. But use them carefully in a professional way to contact people, make connections and follow trends in potential careers. Make sure that you keep more personal content private and be especially careful if you are posting pictures, comments or short articles. A good test is to consider how they might look in the future.

Positive networking may not land that dream job immediately but it will help you move to the next stage whether it be employment or further study. It will remain an important aspect of managing your future career as a graduate.

Careers in Nature Conservation

Louise Mason is Second Year Geography with a proficiency in Spanish at the University of Exeter. She talked to us about how she enhanced her skills and experience with the Careers in Nature Conservation Programme. 

The beautiful and diverse Portuguese landscape

The beautiful and diverse Portuguese landscape

Being a Geographer with a love for nature and the environment, I jumped at the opportunity to apply for the Careers in Nature Conservation Programme. After applying online and attending an interview (my first one!), I was excited to find out that I had successfully gained a place. I didn’t fully know what to expect, but I hoped that the experience would aid me in deciding what I want to do in the future, and to develop some skills to help me achieve this.

We arrived in Mitra, Portugal a day late after flight complications, but everyone was so friendly that we slotted into the group without any issues. Our experience was split around a mixture of employability classes, employer presentations and practical activities on the montado. The montado landscape was the focus of our nature-related investigation; its mix of scrubland and forest providing us with a field space rich in biodiversity.

Our sessions included valuable employability skills such as learning about presentation skills, CVs and having a growth mindset, whilst the interactions with employers gave us some really useful information about the importance of networking and examples of how people in the industry had achieved their career goals.

“Not only have I reaffirmed my interest in nature conservation and learnt some valuable skills for my future career, I had a great time laughing and learning with individuals, now friends, from across Europe.”

During the week we visited the nearby city of Évora, where we had a look around one of the impressive university buildings, before having a delicious lunch on the campus. We then had a session about entrepreneurship and the business canvas model where we worked in groups to plan a business, taking into account some of the key principles we had learnt beforehand.

Exploring the montado

Exploring the montado

Working with a range of experts throughout the week, particularly in employability, insects and birds, the week culminated in three nature walks led by us trainees. In our group of three, one person from the UK, Hungary and Portugal, we planned our audit task based on our chosen creature, grasshoppers, with some help from a species expert (thanks Gergő!). Being the last walk of the day we had to contend with some ‘disruptive participants’, but it went well, meaning in the afternoon we could all relax and enjoy our last evening in Portugal.

Much to my excitement one of the project trainers from SPEA (Portuguese Society for the Study of Birds) agreed to take us back to Évora in the afternoon where we explored the Chapel of Bones, the Cathedral and had some time with the group. Our meal times throughout the week were also a great time to get to know the other trainees and the trainers, not to mention tucking into the delicious food that was prepared for us every day. This was also a great time to try and learn a few Portuguese phrases from the other participants who were very helpful, and kindly put up with my terrible pronunciation!

If a trip to Portugal was not enough, I have come away from this week having developed my skill sets in numerous areas. Not only have I reaffirmed my interest in nature conservation and learnt some valuable skills for my future career, I had a great time laughing and learning with individuals, now friends, from across Europe.

cinclogo

How you can get involved If you’re interested in participating in this project, you can apply to take part in the Participative Management Training programme that will be running in south Devon in August 2017.  You’ll also get to work with students from Hungary and Portugal and work with the trainers I worked with in Portugal. ex.ac.uk/cinc

You can find out more about the project and access a lot of learning materials by logging into the project website  http://careersinconservation.elte.hu/moodle/login/

Follow the twitter feed #careersinconservationka2

Pathways to International Trade

Federico Aulizio

Federico Aulizio

Federico Aulizio is a current BSc Politics and International Relations with Study Abroad student. Last Summer Vacation he took part in Exeter’s Pathways to International Trade programme; bringing together talented students and SMEs, alongside training from UK Trade and Investment (UKTI).

What is Pathways to International Trade?

The programme consisted of two parts; the first one was a week of training where professional trade advisors from UKTI came to Exeter and taught us a range of topics, including digital marketing and its influence on the present day, and the importance of cultural understanding when entering an international market.  The second part was an internship where we applied what we learned in the training to the tasks given to us by our assigned clients.

Why did you get involved?

I’m currently a student in International Relations and I wanted an insight on the PR and business side of things. It hasn’t helped specifically for my initial career idea, but it has certainly helped me expand my possible careers plans; as a student, I can’t be closed to ideas or be smallminded. This internship showed me and my fellow interns that expanding our insight can be scary since you may not be completely familiar with the topic or tasks, but at the end of the day it’s worth it.

How did you find the selection process?

Different (in a great way)! There is nothing that gives more relief to a student than realising that your face-to-face interview for the internship ends up being a series of collective activities with people that are there for the same reason as you. Other than being an engaging and thought-provoking exercise, it was an entertaining activity where you would meet your future intern mates and have a taste of the friendly atmosphere you were about to enter.

What did you think of the training?

Having finished my First Year a couple days before the training began, the last thing I wanted was to sit in a room for hours and listening to people lecture me on marketing and trading. But that was the complete opposite of what happened. Yes, there was some sitting involved, but the organisation, mechanics and interactive part of each day made it feel less like a lecture hall. The speakers were very knowledgeable with real life experience and made me feel more equipped for the workforce.

How was your internship? What did you do, and what did you take away from it?

I feel absolutely confident this internship went well. The program itself is closely linked, if not operated, by UKTI which is a quite influential and important branch of the UK government. Therefore, having done an internship with them is great for my CV.

My tasks consisted of finding my client’s competitors for that specific market in a specific country and compared them to my client. I researched the trade laws in the countries assigned and examined them to see if they could impact my client’s products in anyway. Finally, I researched the best possible way for my client to advertise their product using social media and/or hard advertising.

A word for future candidates for this scheme?

Well, my memory would say to do it for the free Domino’s at the end of the training! But my conscious however, would say to do it for your future. It may not be what you want to do in the years to come, but it is certainly a big step in expanding your horizon. It can open doors that you thought would remain closed for a long time, if not forever. It doesn’t cost you anything to try. If you see it doesn’t fit you, you leave with your mouth stuffed with pizza and your pockets filled with a great experience and memories.

Applications for the 2017 Pathways to International Trade programme open January 2017.

Internships that Click

Anna Gibbon is a recent Exeter graduate. She talked to us about how her internship with The Click Hub led to a graduate role in the same company.

Last month, I was lucky enough to meet with Santander’s CEO, Nathan Bostock, at an event hosted by the University of Exeter. I graduated in the summer, and in my final year Exeter created and supported an incredible 60 internships, which wouldn’t have been possible without the £82,000 backing from Santander Universities.

The Click Hub’s Anna, Santander CEO Nathan Bostock, and Exeter’s Employer Liaison Officer Jo McCreedie

The Click Hub’s Anna, Santander CEO Nathan Bostock, and Exeter’s Employer Liaison Officer Jo McCreedie

Over the course of my studies, I undertook a long-term internship with The Click Hub, a digital marketing agency based in Exeter and London. The company has taken on several interns through the scheme, all of who have gone on to work in similar fields.

I heard about The Click Hub from another student. She told me how they were a small company looking to take on another intern. This was over 3 years ago, and I hadn’t heard of SEO (Search Engine Optimisation), and didn’t know much about digital marketing, but they were looking for content writers and I thought that my skills as an English Literature student would put me in good stead.

“Not only was my internship a fantastic opportunity to apply my academic abilities in a professional environment, build my confidence and develop my employability skills, but without the internship I probably wouldn’t have ended up working for the company after I graduated too.”

For me it was the ideal kind of internship. Many people use the Vacations as an opportunity to take part in an internship but being a big lover of travel I wasn’t quite ready to give up my holiday time just yet. My long-term internship with The Click Hub allowed me to undertake an internship alongside my studies, during Term time.

Over the years I learned a great deal, not just about digital marketing but about a whole range of industries as I wrote regular content and website copy for miscellaneous clients. From web designers to interior designers, builders, dentists, and accountants – you name the industry, I probably wrote a blog about it. The role taught me to be flexible as well as self-motivated since much of the work was carried out at home. However, during the time spent in the office I had the opportunity to learn about digital marketing. I became more interested in the workings behind SEO, and watching our clients progress up the Google rankings, eventually taking my Adwords exam to become Google certified.

Not only was my internship a fantastic opportunity to apply my academic abilities in a professional environment, build my confidence and develop my employability skills, but without the internship I probably wouldn’t have ended up working for the company after I graduated too.

Halfway through my final year of study, the company director offered me a full-time position after graduation. I’d seen the company grow from 5 to around 15 people and take on a great number of new clients over the years. I knew they were about to open an office in London, with plans to expand to New York, and I knew that if I worked there I would be genuinely valued as an employee. That’s one of the best things about working for an SME; you know you’ll never just fade into the background. It means that when I began my full-time position as Marketing Executive I was thrown in at the deep and expected to stay afloat because an SME won’t have the same resources as a larger firm when it comes to training. This has the potential to feel overwhelming but it also allows you to develop in other ways. What’s more, you’re in a company you know has invested in you.

I’ve been lucky enough to benefit from both Santander’s financial support and the huge amount of dedicated work carried out by the University’s Career Zone first-hand, so the event was a fantastic way to say thank you to all involved and let them know the result of their great work. And, working for a digital marketing agency, I just couldn’t leave without taking a quick selfie with both parties (on my boss’s orders)…