Rising Powers and Conflict Management Project (2012-2016)

Economic and Social Research Council Project (ES/J013056/1)

Rising Powers and Conflict Management in Central Asia

In a changing world order, a better understanding of the different ways that states try to manage violent conflict is increasingly important. This ESRC-funded project examines the divergent responses of Russia, China and the West to outbreaks of armed violence in post-Soviet Central Asia as well as exploring the local politics of managing conflict.

 

TEAM

Dr John Heathershaw, Principal Investigator, University of Exeter

Dr David Lewis, Co-Investigator, University of Exeter

Dr Nick Megoran, Co-Investigator, Newcastle University

Ivan Campbell, Bernardo Mariani and colleagues, Co-Investigator, Saferworld

A total of 13 researchers and research assistants have contributed to the project and are acknowledged in publications or included as co-authors where this is possible on safety grounds.  An international advisory board of seven persons includes persons from Central Asia Russia, China, the US and the UK.

 

PROJECT-LINKED WORKSHOPS

13 March 2013, PROJECT LAUNCH, Exeter

10 September 2013, Opening Workshop and Chatham House seminar – Conflict Management in Central Asia

3-5 June 2015, Central Asia Book Workshop @ OSCE Academy, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

14 October 2015, China Workshop @ Shanghai Institutes of International Studies, China

23 October 2015, Joint Event at Chatham House with University of Cambridge –  Russia and China: entanglements and points of tension

18 May 2016, Russia Workshop @ Institute of Oriental Studies, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow

13-14 July, 2016 Final Workshop and Chatham House seminar – Dealing with Illiberalism: lessons from Central Asia?

 

RELEVANT PUBLICATIONS

By John Heathershaw:

with David Gulette, ‘The Affective Politics of Sovereignty: relfecting on the 2010 crisis in Kyrgyzstan’, Nationalities Papers, 43(1), 2015. 122-139

By David Lewis:

Understanding the Authoritarian State: Neopatrimonialism in Central Asia’, Brown Journal of World Affairs, vol. XIX, no. 1, 2012

Who’s Socialising Whom? Regional Organisations and Contested Norms in Central Asia, Europe – Asia Studies, vol. 64, no. 7, 2012, 1219-1237

Sovereignty after empire: The colonial roots of central Asian authoritarianism’, in Sovereignty after Empire, 2011, 178-195

Security Sector Reform in authoritarian regimes: The OSCE experience of police assistance programming in Central Asia’, Security and Human Rights, vol. 22, no. 2, 2011, 103-117

By Anna Matveeva:

with  Savin, I., Faizullaev, B. (2012) ‘Kyrgyzstan: Tragedy in the South,’ Ethnopolitics Papers, Exeter Centre for Ethnopolitical Studies/ Specialist Group Ethnopolitics of the UK Political Studies Association, no. 17, April 2011

Violence in Kyrgyzstan, vacuum in the region: the case for Russia-EU joint crisis management,’ (2011) London School of Economics, Civil Society & Human Security Research Unit Working Paper, December 2011.

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