Exeter Marine Podcast: Becoming Marine Biologists – with Lauren Henly, Emma Weschke and Tim Gordon

This episode was recorded back in early 2019. Ben talks to Lauren Henly, Emma Weschke and Tim Gordon, who are all masters by research or PhD students in Prof. Steve Simpson’s research group (you might remember Steve from an earlier episode, Coral Reef Bioacoustics Part I). The discussion focuses around the research they’re all undertaking, what got them interested in marine biology, and what they have done so far.

 


 

About our guests:

Emma Weschke

At the time of recording Emma was a masters by research student and is now undertaking a PhD with the University of Bristol focusing on coral reef fish ecology and bioacoustics.

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Lauren Henly 

Lauren is a PhD student with the University of Exeter and Natural England studying functional ecology and behaviour of wrasse to inform management of wrasse fisheries. She provided us with the update below:

 “I’m now in the 3rd year of my PhD. I’ve been developing lots of different methods to assess the sustainability and potential impacts of the Live Wrasse Fishery on the south coast. I’m using genetics to look at the population structure of wrasse along the south coast so we can identify the most effective management unit size, using stable isotopes to predict the ecological impacts of the fishery, and working to ensure the views of other stakeholders (including recreational anglers) are considered when developing management measures for the fishery. It’s great being able to use such a broad range of techniques to address a key issue.”

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Tim Gordon

Tim is completing a PhD with the University of Exeter and the Australian Institute for Marine Science focusing on coral reef bioacoustcs, what can you learn from coral reefs by listening to them. You can find out more about Tim’s work in a previous episode – Coral Reef Bioacoustics Part II.

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Topics discussed:

  • Sustainability of wrasse fisheries around the UK.
  • Ecological consequences of marine anthropogenic noise on coral reefs, both during the day and at night.
  • How fish use underwater soundscapes.
  • Using underwater sound to aid marine conservation efforts.
  • The impacts of the degredation of coral reef marine noise
  • Using underwater speakers to make reefs louder.
  • The bigger picture aspects of working in a research group.
  • What got you into marine biology?

 


 

Resources:

 


 

Episode and show notes produced by Ben Toulson and Katie Finnimore.

Check out other episodes of the podcast here.

You can subscribe on most podcast apps, if you’re feeling kind please leave us a review!

#ExeterMarine is an interdisciplinary group of marine related researchers with capabilities across the scientific, medical, engineering, humanities and social science fields. If you are interested in working with our researchers or students, contact Emily Easman or visit our website!

 

 

Scientists at Sea Podcast: Sail Against Plastic

Show Notes

 

 

 

Guests – Flora Rendell and Lowenna Jones

 

 

 

Sail Against Plastic started as an idea to simply undertake a sailing expedition, over just a few months it developed into an Arctic mission to investigate unseen pollutants, namely microplastics and noise pollution.

 

“We are a collaborative expedition hoping to unveil and reveal the invisible pollutants of the arctic”

 

The Sail Against Plastic team. Photo credit – Ben Porter

 

Why the Arctic?

It is well documented that plastic debris has been circulating around our oceans via 5 ocean gyres. It is now thought there maybe a sixth gyre that carries plastic up into the Arctic circle. Recent discoveries supporting this theory have shown that plastic has been found in sea ice.

 

“As sea ice melts that could be opening up more microplastics that have been trapped in that sea ice… it shows that we’ve been influencing the world for a long time”

 

A selection of plastics found on mainland Svalbard. Photo credit – Ben Porter

 

A view from the Blue Clipper: Photo credit – Ben Porter

These pieces of plastic aren’t necessarily what you would expect, while there plastic bottles and bags found in these areas, there may be an even greater prevalence of microplastics, tiny pieces of plastic debris resulting from the breakdown of consumer products and industrial waste.

 

“It’s not these big large pieces of plastic, it’s not a floating island that we’re going to find’

 

At the time of recording, the team, a diverse group of scientists, artists, environmentalists, photographers and videographers, were just a few days away from setting sail on the Barents Sea from Svalbard aboard the Blue Clipper.

 

 

The team’s manta trawl, used to collect microplastics. Photo credit – Ben Porter

 

 

“I think the main thing is making issues that are so strongly linked to humans… making you feel emotive about them… through art and through film, people will feel emotive about it and will care, we hope”

 

“And make it relevant to people in the UK and Europe and connect communities that are halfway across the world that have similarities and can work together to find a solution to our crazy plastic addiction”

 

 

 

 

 

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Website – https://www.sailagainstplastic.com/

Blog – https://www.sailagainstplastic.com/blog-1/

Facebook – @amessagefromthearctic

Instagram – @amessagefromthearctic

Twitter – @Sail4seas

Art – Jess Grimsdale & Further info

 

Hosted by Ethan Wrigglesworth and Molly Meadows

Episode and show notes produced by Ben Toulson

 

#ExeterMarine is an interdisciplinary group of marine related researchers with capabilities across the scientific, medical, engineering, humanities and social science fields. If you are interested in working with our researchers or students, contact Michael Hanley or visit our website!

 

Exeter MSc Students Sharing Marine Science Widely

Prof Brendan Godley  teaches a MSc module on Marine Biodiversity and Conservation at the Centre for Ecology and Conservation on the University’s Penryn Campus. The students learn about a wide diversity of topics and undertake independent study on two major topics within their specific interests. These are assessed by a dissertation and an oral presentation to their peers, respectively. This year, the tutor challenged his students to go a stage further and produce an infographic to communicate the message of their oral presentation to a wide audience that could then be shared on Twitter or other social media platforms. Brendan wrote;

Communicating science, especially conservation science, to a wide audience is a key skill we all need to work on. This was my initial reasoning for setting the task. I think. however, that the exercise really challenged the students to distil and clarify their key take-home messages in advance of giving their talks. They achieved both of these aims with some aplomb and were widely complimented on their work.”

 

The module sees a range of invited marine conservation practitioners sharing their sectoral experience with the students. Katrina Ryan of Mindfully Wired a consultancy which specialises in science communication was one of the invited experts this year and gave the students feedback on their infographics as part of her session. Katrina added;

“It’s wonderful to see vital communication skills being fostered as part of these students’ wider conservation science learning. Condensing such complex subject matters into compelling graphics is a real challenge, but the students did a superb job and, as a result, many had significant impact on social media”

Tweet from Hetty Upton

Click her to see a storify of the tweets, starting with the single most impactful by Hetty Upton.

 

#ExeterMarine is a interdisciplinary group of marine related researchers with capabilities across the scientific, medical, engineering, humanities and social science fields. If you are interested in working with our researchers or students, contact Michael Hanley or visit our website!