Adventures in Borneo

In June 2019, my post-doc Paulo Bittencourt and my PhD student David Bartholomew returned to Sepilok in Malaysian Borneo for a soil collection campaign. They are trying to understand how different soil characteristics determine the fine-scale distribution patterns of the dipterocarp trees across an environmental gradient. Over one month, they collected over 1000 soil samples for nutrient analysis and calibrated their soil moisture sensors.

In June 2019, my post-doc Paulo Bittencourt and my PhD student David Bartholomew returned to Sepilok in Malaysian Borneo for a soil collection campaign. They are trying to understand how different soil characteristics determine the fine-scale distribution patterns of the dipterocarp trees across an environmental gradient. Over one month, they collected over 1000 soil samples for nutrient analysis and calibrated their soil moisture sensors.

Site visits to Chapada dos Veadeiros, Brazil, May 2019

Recently I visited the location of my latest project to investigate how to test the effectiveness of restoration techniques in savanna vegetation in Brazil. We visited restoration experiments in the Chapada dos Veadeiros national park in Brazil. The trip was brilliant, we found some excellent locations for our new studies with collaborators Rafael Oliveira, Isabel Schmidt and Alexandre Sampaio. I really look forward to a great project over the next few years.

My newest adventure

The birth of my baby girl

My latest and best adventure yet has been the birth of my baby girl. It brings a whole new, brilliant challenge to life and academia. I owe a huge thank you to the colleagues that have supported me through my pregnancy and are continuing to do so during my  maternity leave.

Measuring Sapflux in Ghana

Installing new sapflow sensors in Bobiri semi-deciduous forest in Ghana

In collaboration with Prof. Yadvinder Malhi (Univ. of Oxford) and Dr. Stephen Adu-Bredu (FORIG) I travelled to Ghana in June 2017 to install some new sapflow sensors into trees to look at the effects of seasonality on tree transpiration.

Fieldwork in the Amazon 2017

In 2017 I returned to the Caxiuanã drought experiment for another 6 weeks with a team of 9 people to extend the work of our 2016 campaign to the forests largest and smallest trees. We focused heavily on how hydraulic and photosynthetic traits in saplings contrasted those of the canopy giants.

Fieldwork in the Amazon 2016

Fieldwork Measuring Functional Traits at the Worlds Longest Running Tropical Forest Drought Experiment

In 2016 myself and a team of 10 students and technicians spent 6 weeks at the Caxiuanã drought experiment site, where a 1ha patch of forest has been receiving only 50% of the canopy throughfall since 2002. On over 150 trees of different sizes and species we made measurements of plant structural, hydraulic and photosynthetic properties to establish what combination of traits make trees most susceptible to drought stress. Here are some photos from our field campaign.

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