‘Mystery, Science and the Divine’

University College London

Summer School in Ancient Philosophy

Monday 13 July to Friday 17 July 2020

The UCL Ancient Philosophy Summer School is offering exceptional one-week intensive courses this summer at opportunity-cost prices (£120) .

  • The one-week intensive courses will be available online for the first time and accessible from any part of the world.
  • There will be video lectures as well as discussion time with excellent tutors
  • Participants will be provided with all materials and have the opportunity to talk about the ideas with other participants as well as the tutors
  • The course on ‘Mystery, Science and the Divine’ is being developed and will be actively guided by two tutors specialised in Ancient Philosophy, Late Antiquity and Medieval Philosophy

Some of the questions that will be tackled include:

  • What are the origins of rationality?
  • Why were the deeper teachings of philosophical schools (e.g. Plato and Stoics) made accessible only to the ‘initiated’?
  • Why is the divine so important for the ancients?
  • Why did specific philosophical schools deal with magic, alchemy and astrology?
  • How is the notion of ‘divine’ associated with philosophy and the occult arts?
  • What kind of impetus was given to philosophy and science by the occult arts?
  • Was magic and astrology really irrational during ancient times?

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/classics/outreach/summer-schools/ucl-summer-school-ancient-philosophy-2020

For further information on the ‘Mystery, Science and the Divine’ course please contact: robert.heller@kcl.ac.uk or athanasios.rinotas@kuleuven.be

Visions as practice in practice-based research

A presentation by Sarah Scaife given to the Exeter University Magic & Esotericism Research Group on 27 May 2020. This work was catalysed by Dr Emily Selove’s presentation, Dangerous Books, to the same research group on 3 April 2020. Scaife was intrigued by Selove’s reference to a spell involving “a slave girl”, which relied on the intimate interior of a woman’s body as a site of magic. This brought to mind Bernini’s sculpture of a woman who began to experience religious ecstasy during almost a year of ill-health, The Ecstasy of St Teresa, and links to Scaife’s own practice-based research. The PDF shared here is the Notes view of her 30 minute presentation:

Visions_as_practice_in_practice-based_re

Sarah Scaife’s Academia.edu profile can be found here:

https://exeter.academia.edu/SarahScaife