The Holistic Librarian – Thing 14

Hi. I am Anne Dinan and I am the Subject Librarian for Education, Sociology, Philosophy and Anthropology

Task 14 was:

A researcher asks if his research data can count as a research output for the REF. How would you find out?

What I knew about the topic beforehand:

I knew that REF aims to increase the quality of the research, and that data has to be submitted for the REF, but not the details and criteria involved.

What I know now:

The REF will assess 3 elements which reflect the key characteristics of research excellence: outputs, impact and environment.  The elements will be assessed and rated by the expert panels on a five-point scale, varying from unclassified to four-star (exceptional i.e. world leading). The quality of research outputs will be the main element of the assessment.

All submitted outputs will be treated equally, and panels will not make judgements about the quality of outputs solely on the basis of citation information.

HEIs should select staff and their outputs for assessment. Eligible staff are those who have produced research of high quality;  all types of high quality research output are encouraged.  The criteria for assessing outputs will be ‘originality, rigour and significance’.  Sub-panels will assess outputs through expert review.  Outputs will be assessed against international standards of excellence.

Types of output should be categorised into the following broad types:

  1. Books (or parts of books). ii. Journal articles and conference contributions. iii. Physical artefacts. iv. Exhibitions and performances. v. Other documents. vi. Digital artefacts (including web content). vii. Other.

In some cases, research data can be research output for the REF.

How did I obtain this knowledge?

There is useful information on REF on their website.   There is an Assessment Framework and Guidance on Submissions.

Further information within the University of Exeter may be obtained from:

The Open Access and Data Curation Team and Research Knowledge and Transfer

What else would I like to know about the topic?

This is an area which subject librarians need to know more about in order to answer individual enquiries.  It is a complicated and new area, so advice would be useful.  So far, I have responded to requests as they arise.

How did I find this task? How would improve it?

Collating the information on all topics would be useful. A group discussion would be beneficial, so that feedback and ideas could be exchanged.

Posted under Holistic Librarian, Training

This post was written by eadinan on December 19, 2012

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The Holistic Librarian – Thing 15

Hi. I am Anne Dinan and I am the Subject Librarian for Education, Sociology, Philosophy and Anthropology

Task 15 was : What advice could you give a researcher about naming and organising files and folders? How would you find out this information?

What I knew about the topic beforehand:

We all create and save documents all the time, but may not be doing so in a systematic and efficient way. Being better organised means that the documents can be found more easily.  The PC will run better if you regularly clean out files which are no longer needed as they take up unnecessary space.

What I know now:

It will save time and be more efficient to follow certain guidelines.   Some tips include:

Keep things simple. Be consistent.

Keep names short.  It is better to avoid long file names.  Create separate sub-folders e.g. draft 1, final draft.

Use numbers to name different versions of files e.g. Policy1, Policy2

Use dates to identify different versions e.g. Chapter 050911 = chapter from 5th September 2011, Chapter 0501212 = chapter from 5th December 2012

Avoid large folder structures.  If necessary, use an alphabetical menu which makes it simple to find files.

Separate ongoing and completed work.  Review work regularly and remove files which are no longer current to a different folder.

Always back up work.  Keep copy of files on desktop, USB, CD, or archive folder.

Make sure that your system of organising files and folders is acceptable and useful to others working with you.

Make sure that your way of storing files can be understood in the future.

How did I obtain this knowledge?

Some tips were given at a talk by Open Access and Data Curation Manager during Open Access Week in October 2012.

More help can be found on the web, including:

File organization tips from Microsoft

and Easy Computer tips.

What else would you like to know about the topic?

Other  tips and amendments might be made where necessary if future need arises.

How did I find this task?  How would I improve it?

It was useful to look at ways of storing information more effectively and efficiently.

 

 

Posted under Holistic Librarian, Training

This post was written by eadinan on December 19, 2012

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The Holistic Librarian – Thing 18

Hi, I’m Aeronwen Cole and I am the Subject Librarian for Archaeology, Classics & Ancient History, History and Modern Languages.

Task 18 was to document “Which factors could affect the Intellectual Property Rights of a dataset? Where can you find guidance on this?”

What I knew about the topic beforehand:

I knew that I should think about: Who created it; Where it was created; When it was created; Who funded the research out of which the dataset was created.

I would go to the Research and Knowledge Transfer (RKT) webpages for information on this topic.

What I know now:

I know that if a researcher is employed by the University then the data belongs to the University. I also now know that the IPR situation can be less clear cut when other institutions are involved.

How did I obtain this knowledge?:

I looked at the RKT and Legal Services webpages.

What else would I like to know about this topic:

I have previously received copyright questions from researchers concerning open access publications. In the future I may receive similar questions concerning datasets so I will keep an eye on the RKT pages for updates.

How did I find this task? How would I improve it?

I found this task difficult to research as I have never had any enquiries from researchers on IPR issues concerning datasets.

Posted under Holistic Librarian, Training

This post was written by A.G.Cole on December 17, 2012

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The Holistic Librarian – Thing 17

Hi, I’m Aeronwen Cole and I am the Subject Librarian for Archaeology, Classics & Ancient History, History and Modern Languages.

Task 17 was to document “What types of information does the Data Protection Act cover? In which ways should this data be treated differently from non-sensitive data?”

What I knew about the topic beforehand:

I knew the Act covered personal data relating to living individuals.

What I know now:

The Act covers personal information about living individuals in both electronic form and manual form (e.g. paper files) when the information is held in a relevant, structured filing system.

Data covered by the Data Protection Act should not be shared with other researchers unless informed consent has been obtained by the relevant parties. It may also not be possible to make this data available via open access unless it is anonymised.

How did I obtain this knowledge?:

I looked at the University of Exeter Data Protection web pages. I attended a session on data protection during Open Access week given by Caroline Dominey (the University’s Records Manager) where this topic was discussed.

What else would I like to know about this topic:

I haven’t had to deal with enquiries of this nature in my work yet but potentially it’s something I’ll need to learn more about if I receive specific enquiries.

How did I find this task? How would I improve it?

I found the second part of the question ambiguous.

Posted under Holistic Librarian, Training

This post was written by A.G.Cole on December 17, 2012

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The Holistic Librarian – Thing 16

Hi, I’m Aeronwen Cole and I’m the Subject Librarian for Archaeology, Classics & Ancient History, History and Modern Languages.

Task 16 was to document “A researcher receives a Freedom of Information request about research data. How should he proceed and what should he consider when responding to the request?”

What I knew about the topic beforehand:

I knew Freedom of Information (FoI) requests must be responded to unless an exemption allows you not to disclose the information. I was aware of some high profile cases where researchers haven’t wanted to respond to a FoI request.

What I know now:

Legislation requires the University to respond to a FoI request within 20 working days from receipt of the request. It is good practice to acknowledge a request on receipt. If a researcher is in any doubt about how to respond or does not want to supply the data then he should consult his immediately. If a researcher normally agrees to share data, he should continue to do so, whilst bearing in mind areas such as ethics, privacy and confidentiality. However, in circumstances where he does not want to supply the data, or if he thinks there are legal or ethical reasons why he shouldn’t supply it then he should consult his FoI Practitioner as soon as possible. He should keep all communications between himself and the requester.

How did I obtain this knowledge?:

I looked at the JISC Freedom of Information and research data: questions and answers web site and the University of Exeter Freedom of Information web pages.

What else would I like to know about this topic:

My awareness of this issue will increase if I have requests from researchers.

How did I find this task? How would I improve it?

I found this task interesting to research and I’ve learnt a lot.

Posted under Holistic Librarian, Training

This post was written by A.G.Cole on December 5, 2012

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The Holistic Librarian – Thing 23+1

Hi, I’m Patrick Overy and I am the subject librarian for Law and Business.

Task 23+1 was to document “Where could a researcher go to get help writing a data management plan?”

What I knew about the topic beforehand:

I have never been asked to help to write a data management plan, although I am often consulted about research sources, bibliographic software and literature reviews.

What I know now

Students on the Open Exeter project have produced a useful guide to new researchers, available on ERIC as Research Data Management Survival Guide

http://hdl.handle.net/10036/3738

The Library is also building up an online resource at http://as.exeter.ac.uk/library/resources/openaccess/openexeter/datamanagement/

The DCC has developed an online tool to help researchers https://dmponline.dcc.ac.uk/ – this includes customised sections relevant to specific funders.

There is also a useful online guide produced by the University of Bath at http://www.bath.ac.uk/research/data/planning/checklist.html

How did I obtain this knowledge?

Try online sources of advice in the UK and beyond – the Digital Curation Centre  http://www.dcc.ac.uk/ to start with but also further afield, e.g

http://library.uoregon.edu/datamanagement/index.html

Some funders require a data management plan as part of research proposals, e.g. the National Science Foundation in the USA (see How to Write a Data Management Plan for a National Science Foundation (NSF) Proposal: http://intranet2.lternet.edu/node/3248)

Finally, each task asks the questions “What else would you like to know about the topic?” and “How did you find this task? How would you improve it?”

I am sure that I will need to know more about all of these topics to meet the needs of researchers but so far I will just have to react to individual requests. I found the tasks useful and hope the results will feed into a permanent online resource.

Posted under Holistic Librarian, Training

This post was written by Hannah Lloyd-Jones on November 30, 2012

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The Holistic Librarian – Thing 23

Hi, I’m Patrick Overy and I am the subject librarian for Law and Business.

Task 23 was to document “What is the importance of licensing research data? Where can you find out more about licensing research data?”

What I knew about the topic beforehand:

Licensing research data may mean either:

  1. Getting permission to use data produced by another researcher/research body/commercial enterprise for your own purposes or
  2. Making your research data publicly available but still controlling its use by third parties

As researchers in the Business School in particular make heavy use of data which is commercially produced I am frequently involved in setting up access to services or advising on available datasets.

If data is produced by national or international bodies and available via ESRC (Economic and Social Data Service) any research has to be submitted to the UK Data Archive to complement the original data although copyright may determine whether it can be publicly available.

What I know now

Many public bodies are choosing to follow Creative Commons practices, e.g. TERN  in Australia http://tern.org.au/   If data is created by the researcher it can be licensed via Creative Commons style licences, although this is sometimes not a suitable solution.  JISC has produced a help guide for licensing open access data at http://discovery.ac.uk/files/pdf/Licensing_Open_Data_A_Practical_Guide.pdf

A general guide has been produced by the DCC:  Ball, A. (2012). ‘How to License Research Data’. DCC How-to Guides. Edinburgh: Digital Curation Centre. Available online: http://www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/how-guides/license-research-data

How did I obtain this knowledge?

Try online sources of advice in the UK and beyond – the Digital Curation Centre  http://www.dcc.ac.uk/ to start with, especially http://www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/how-guides.

Posted under Holistic Librarian, Training

This post was written by Hannah Lloyd-Jones on November 30, 2012

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The Holistic Librarian – Thing 22

Hi, I’m Patrick Overy and I am the subject librarian for Law and Business.

As part of the Holistic Librarian project I was asked to research 3 tasks connected with the management of research data.

Task 22 was to document “What advice I would offer a researcher in order for their research data to be discoverable and visible on the internet?”

What I knew about the topic beforehand:

Before the start of the Open Exeter project I was not very aware of the problems of researchers producing data and the challenges involved in archiving and providing continuing access to it.

Although I have been involved in populating ERIC, the institutional repository for several years, this has generally meant dealing with research outputs in the form of articles, working papers and reports, rather than the underlying data.

What I know now

What options are available for researchers to archive their data.

  1. There are facilities as part of ERIC https://eric.exeter.ac.uk/repository/
  2. At a national level the UK Data Archive has produced an extensive guide which covers all aspects of the production and archiving of data; (Managing and sharing data. 3rd ed (2011) Colchester: UK Data Archive http://data-archive.ac.uk/media/2894/managingsharing.pdf
  3. Nationally and internationally there are subject repositories which may be a better solution, particularly if the research is collaborative and may be cross-border

How to ensure that their research is easily found by using the best metadata – see examples at http://libguides.lib.msu.edu/citedata  Choose the most appropriate search terms to describe the exact nature of the data so that it is obvious to researchers.

How researchers can make maximum use of research networks and social media to advertise the location of their research data.

How did I obtain this knowledge?

This advice comes from basic research on Google as well as the help pages associated with different online sources of advice in the UK and beyond – Digital Curation Centre http://www.dcc.ac.uk/ to start with but also further afield, e.g. Michigan State University http://www.lib.msu.edu/about/diginfo/discover.jsp

Posted under Holistic Librarian, Training

This post was written by Hannah Lloyd-Jones on November 30, 2012

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The Holistic Librarian is Back!

After a short break, we are pleased to announce that our Holistic Librarian pilot training project is back! We have divided up the tasks amongst the whole Exeter-based Subject Librarian team in order to get wider feedback on the usefulness of this approach to training. Our initial list of 23 Things has now become 23+1 Things and we will be linking to the individual blog posts from the Subject Librarians from this blog as the tasks will not be completed in any particular order!

The 23+1 Things for Research Data Management are as follows:

1. What is research data?

2. A researcher asks if she can put video footage of children on the Exeter Data Archive. How would you respond?

3. A researcher wants to publish an article and the data that backs up their conclusions on Open Access. What options does the researcher have?

4. If a researcher came to you asking how they could share their research data with somebody external to the University what would you recommend?

5. What is our institutional policy on OA and RDM and how does it compare to other institutions’ policies? Are there any other institutional policies that affect research data management?

6. Where can a University of Exeter researcher store her live research data?

7. If a researcher asked you how to cite a data set, which resources could you point him to?

8. A researcher asks you about her funder requirements on research data. Where you could find out this information?

9. What is the importance of documenting research data and metadata? Where can you find useful information on data documentation and metadata?

10. A researcher has used a secondary data set in their research. In which circumstances would she be able to put this on Open Access?

11. What advice could you give to a researcher about backing-up his research data?

12. What evidence can you cite that research made available on Open Access has more impact than research that is not available on Open Access?

13. A post-doctoral researcher is leaving the University and the research that she has undertaken is part of a larger research project. What advice would give her so that the research is usable by the other members of the research group?

14. A researcher asks if his research data can count as a research output for the REF. How would you find out?

15. What advice could you give a researcher about naming and organising files and folders? How would you find out this information?

16. A researcher receives a Freedom of Information request about research data. How should he proceed and what should he consider when responding to the request?

17. What types of information does the Data Protection Act cover? In which ways should this data be treated differently from non-sensitive data?

18. Which factors could affect the Intellectual Property Rights of a dataset? Where can you find guidance on this?

19. A researcher is working with a commercial partner on a research project. In which circumstances could the researcher make the research data from this project available on Open Access?

20. A researcher wants to archive sensitive research data securely for long-term preservation. What options does she have?

21. Which criteria could a researcher use to select which research data he needs to preserve in the long-term?

22. What advice would you offer a researcher in order for their research data to be discoverable and visible on the internet?

23. What is the importance of licensing research data? Where can you find out more about licensing research data?

23 +1. Where could a researcher go to get help writing a data management plan?

 

We asked the Subject Librarians to answer the following questions in their responses:

1. What did you know about the topic before the task?

2. What do you know about the topic now?

3. How did you obtain this knowledge?

4. What else would you like to know about the topic?

5. How did you find this task? How would you improve it?

 

Check back to see more responses soon!

Posted under Holistic Librarian, Training

This post was written by Hannah Lloyd-Jones on November 30, 2012

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Holistic Librarian: Thing 3

Introduction:
As the Holistic Librarian, I am piloting a self-learning training course on Research Data Management for Subject Librarians. My third task was to document my response to a researcher who wants to publish an article and the data that backs up their conclusions on Open Access.

What I knew about the topic before the task:

I knew that the phrase ‘on open access’ signified a movement (in higher education) that aimed to bypass the likes of publisher’s burgeoning pay walls, making the results of publicly funded research… public, which entails collaboration – a word that has a positive meaning now- can happen.

What I know now:

I’m starting to realise the gravitas of ERIC The Exeter Research and Institutional Content archive –The University of Exeter’s repository, and what Symplectic is  – the University’s research publications management system – via which data can be reposited on ERIC yielding a permanent reference link.
Open Access to Publications has varying degrees of repositability depending on the Publisher’s policies as on the website Sherpa Romeo where permissions are colour coded:

Gold: paid for open access publishing

Other Archiving colours

Green: can archive pre-print and post-print
Blue: can archive post-print (i.e. final draft post-refereeing)
Yellow: can archive pre-print (i.e. pre-refereeing)
White: archiving not formally supported

For Data repositing there is a dedicated repository EDA at Exeter (for image repositing there is DCO).
I obtained this information first by searching on the university website which yielded the following highly informative result:

rep

Perhaps there ought to be a consulting OA officer with a dedicated website, chat and FAQs given the growing significance of OA in the fabric of research – This OAO should be embedded in various team meetings where OA is publicised and receives maximum exposure and support.
I found the task a learning curve, and would like to have the confidence now to contribute fully as a Subject Librarian to making OA a reality.

Posted under Holistic Librarian, Training

This post was written by Afzal Hasan on July 16, 2012

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