Interview with the Joint Presidents of the Sociology and Anthropology Society

One of the ways you can get more involved in the SPA department is through the Sociology and Anthropology Society, who put on both social and academic events and are a good port-of-call for any issues students may have. In this interview, we talk to Joint Presidents Lily Francis and Rachel Reed about studying at Exeter and the society itself.

Introduce yourselves!

LF: Hi, my name is Lily Francis, I am a third year sociology student and Joint President of the Sociology and Anthropology Society!

RR: I’m Rachel, Joint President of the Sociology and Anthropology Society and a third year BA Sociology Student.

Why did you choose to study Sociology?

LF: I chose to study Sociology because I always knew I was interested in people and why we act in the ways that we do. Once I studied Sociology at A level I knew it was the subject for me! I love the range of topics you can cover in sociology, anything from media, to health, to globalisation and I honestly feel that it relates to the actual world we live in, rather than being too theoretical!

RR: I was supposed to study Biology as an A level but I got put off by the course. I started scrolling through the courses at college and came across Sociology. After reading about it and researching it, I discovered that it was something I’d rather be doing. I preferred looking at different aspects of society, particularly education and childhood. So I quickly changed my Biology A level to Sociology. After working hard and getting an A*, I realised it was something I enjoyed and should carry on pursuing.

What’s your favourite thing about studying in Exeter?

LF: The range of subjects that we can study, and the flexibility of the courses here. I’ve taken modules in Sociology, Anthropology, and Philosophy which means I’ve been able to widen my knowledge and be more than simply a Sociology student. I also love the campus! It’s so pretty and green, and I am always finding new places that I hadn’t yet discovered like the gardens surrounding Reed Hall.

RR: The campus! It’s so green and open. Although the hills are a struggle; it’s a good workout!

Why did you get involved with the Sociology and Anthropology Society and why should others do the same?

LF: I thought it would be a great way to make friends – and I was right! Most of my really close friendships at Exeter have originated from the society, whether we met at my fresher’s meet and greet picnic, or at a social in 2nd year, I have found some amazing people to hang out with! I think being part of the committee only strengthens those relationships, but also is a great way to develop yourself as a person! I have gained lots of confidence by being on the committee, and have developed vital skills that will (hopefully) impress future employers!

RR: I joined SocAntSoc as a member in first year. At the end of first year I realised that I hadn’t been getting involved in as much activities as I would have liked to. The AGM for SocAntSoc arrived and I decided I should run and got the place as the academic and careers rep. Then this year I got the joint role of president. It allowed me to take a break from studies, explore what Exeter has to offer outside of the University and to make new friends. Not only that, but it can allow students to help each other with their modules

Do you have any study tips for your fellow students that you consider vital?

LF: 1) Actually do work in first year (I know, boring!). But it helps you to prepare for the next two years, rather than it being a shock when you find yourself with 3 pieces of coursework that you had never properly practised before!

2) Learn how to reference properly and quickly. Find a method that works for you, and try and do it as you are going along – it saves lots of time in the future.

3) Find a favourite place to work. Mine is at my desk in my flat, but many students like the library, the sanctuary, or even Costa! Wherever you work best – stick to it!

Lastly, I know everyone says it, but actually give yourself a break and have some fun! I guarantee your lasting memories of university will be the good times you shared with your friends rather than slouched over a desk at 2am.

RR: Organise your time – Write down when all of your deadlines are. Make quality notes! They’ll help you out with revision and essays. Finally, get enough sleep!

Finally, what are your post-graduation plans?

LF: To go travelling for a month around South-East Asia, and after hopefully find a job! I am aiming to work in customer services management in the South West area.

RR: I’m going back home to Cornwall as I have a place on a postgraduate SCITT programme. I’m going to (hopefully) become a primary school teacher!

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