Category Archives: Philosophy

SSIS BBQ

Sun, burgers, good laughter, goodie bags and plenty of familiar and new faces – these were all part of the end of year Student Engagement and Academic Representation BBQ held at the RAM garden on campus. The event was organised by George Flower and Anna Hamilton from the College of Social Sciences and International Studies with the aim of rewarding students from the college for their dedication to the improvement of the student experience.

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Plenty of awards recognizing the achievements of various projects and individuals were handed out. Within the department of Sociology, Philosophy and Anthropology (SPA), members of the Sociology and Anthropology society were commended on their contributions to the department, alongside Global Exe, the youth project started by editor of this blog, Jason Chang.

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The BBQ provided an opportunity for SPA to interact with other attendees from CSSIS. Attendees from the politics department who had set up the “Diplomatic Hub” conversed with attendees from Global Exe and exchanged various ideas between each other to improve and make progress to their own individual projects.

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The melting pot of ideas and conversations did not simply stop at the projects and initiatives that students had set up. With the wealth of expertise in attendance, students from law to philosophy conversed about ideas for their future and also the sharing of good practice in their coursework. Among the many themes of discussion at the table included the study of linguistics, military law and even the sociology of name tags!

If you would like to join the table for such interesting conversations and would like to represent your cohort in a leadership position, places are still available to nominate yourself to be a representative for the Sociology, Philosophy or Anthropology SSLC positions! If you would like to find out more information or nominate yourself, email today!

Jason Chang

Desert Island Books: Philosophy

Continuing our ‘Desert Island Books’ posts, editor Samuel Fawcett lists five essential books that any philosophy student should read.

René Descartes – Meditations on First Philosophy

Descartes is often referred to as the father of modern philosophy, and his Meditations underpins his thought and outlines most of his key      ideas. Intended as a proof of the existence of God, the Meditations have nonetheless proved a touchstone for both religious and secular philosophers, as they stress the importance of scepticism and methodic doubt. It is in this work that the famous ‘I think, therefore I am’ statement originates.

Ludwig Wittgenstein – Philosophical Investigations

A hugely controversial figure in his day, Wittgenstein proposed that nearly all philosophical problems were simply due to semantic and linguistic issues. Philosophical Investigations is his attempt to demonstrate the limitations of language and meaning and how it impedes our search for truth. It is a must-read for anyone interested in the philosophy of language, and serves as a foundation for much of post-modern thought. This work is famed for Wittgenstein theorising that if a lion could speak English, we wouldn’t be able to understand it.

Simone de Beauvoir – The Second Sex

De Beauvoir was a giant of both existentialist and feminist philosophy, and her work, The Second Sex, is regarded by many as her magnum opus. The book deals with the multitudinous ways in which women’s bodies and thoughts are regulated by a patriarchal society and puts forward a pathway to liberation. It is a groundbreaking work that is credited with igniting second-wave feminism, and it was instantly placed on the Vatican’s list of prohibited books. It was in this work that de Beauvoir stated, ‘One is not born, but rather becomes, a woman.’

Hegel – The Phenomenology of Spirit

If you can make your way through Hegel’s turgid and often over-complicated prose, The Phenomenology of Spirit is one of the most rewarding and important books in understanding modern philosophy. It is in this work that Hegel outlines his famous ideas of the dialectic and absolute idealism. The broad range of topics and ideas covered in Phenomenology formed the basis for many future philosophical and political schools, including existentialism, communism, fascism and nihilism.

Plato – Republic

No list of essential philosophical texts would be complete without Plato’s Republic. Arguably the most influential work of philosophy and political theory ever written, the Republic outlines Plato’s concepts of justice, liberty and fair governance. In outlining these ideas, Plato also puts forward his famous allegory of the cave and his theory of ideas. So many philosophical schools and ideas can trace their roots back to Plato’s Republic, and this alone makes it an essential read for philosophy students.

Studying for a degree? Consider doing work experience!

One of the most useful things about studying for a degree is the opportunity for work experience and the extra-curricular activities it brings. These endeavours can not only enhance your CV, but also broaden your understanding of the subject and how it relates to the wider world.

I was lucky enough to be accepted to intern at the local office of Ben Bradshaw MP, and I can honestly say that as well as demonstrating the practical applications of sociology the experience was a rewarding one, helping me judge in which direction I wish to take my life.

Exeter’s MP since 1997, Ben Bradshaw. (Image: commons.wikimedia.org)

As Exeter is holding elections for its City Council next month, most of my week was taken up by canvassing. We spent the week traversing the length of Exeter, often accompanied by Ben Bradshaw, which though physically tiring gave me a great opportunity to learn more about the city and its residents. Indeed, any kind of volunteer work within a city broadens your knowledge of the area and makes you feel more a part of it. This was furthered by the fact I was able to meet not only the local MP, but also the council leader and various councillors who were able to share their experiences of working in local government and information about Exeter’s communities and the problems they face. Meeting residents was also very informative; issues raised ranged from housing and schooling to their dislike of Labour’s new direction.

From a sociological point of view, what was most interesting was how demographics offer a key indicator of voting behaviour. While working-class areas and council estates proved more likely to support Labour, they were also far more likely to want to vote to leave the European Union. This ties in with findings that show that people in areas that generally possess a lower level of education and are more directly affected by immigration are more likely to wish to leave the EU. Similarly, while middle-class areas were more likely to vote for the Conservatives, they were also more likely to vote Green, which corresponds to the idea that people who have less to lose are more likely to risk voting for principles rather than out of pragmatism.

Anyone studying for a Social Science degree should make sure they learn something of the society and people about which they are theorising and back up their ideas with hard evidence. An ideal way to do this is through work experience in the political, journalistic or charity fields. University is about more than just studying for a degree, and the excellent connections and services of Exeter University and its SPA department provide students with perfect opportunities to pursue the fields in which they are interested.

Third year? Don’t forget to fill in the National Student Survey!

 

If you are a third year studying Sociology, Philosophy or Anthropology at Exeter you have until April 30 to fill in the National Student Survey (NSS). If you have not done so already, we strongly urge you to do so. Departments which fail to receive feedback from 70% of their students do not get a grade in the following year’s league tables. Currently, the SPA department is only slightly further than halfway to reaching this threshold, meaning that the department, currently in the UK’s Top 10, could become ungraded. Obviously, it is in students’ interests that the department receives a grade, as this will affect the value of our degrees.

For every completed survey, Exeter University will donate one pound to RAG and those who complete the survey will be able to claim a free bar of fairtrade chocolate, or vegan alternative, from Amory reception. Theodore Stone, Subject Chair for SPA, writes: ‘It’s extremely important that finalists provide as much feedback as possible in order to locate problems within the college and improve standards.’

Completing the survey takes less than five minutes, and could make a real difference to your degree. So please, if you’re a third-year SPA student, fill in the NSS at www.thestudentsurvey.com and urge any friends you have who are also finalists to do likewise!

 

Interview with Jen Smith

Jen

This week, we interview Jen Smith, a Masters student pursuing her studies in Philosophy.

Hello Jen, fantastic to meet you. Could you give us a little introduction about yourself?

Hi I’m Jen! I’m 22 and studying an MA by research in Philosophy.

You mentioned you originally did your undergraduate in Australia before having your final term in the University of Exeter. What was it like for you coming over?

Coming over was both incredibly exciting and terrifying.  For me, it was my first time living out of home and while I was fortunate enough to travel with a girl from my home university, I really didn’t know anyone.  However, this soon changed!  I lived at the Printworks with other international students, began working casually at the University and started going to events held by the Sociology and Anthropology society.  I still consider some of my closest friends those who I met on exchange.

Academically, the exchange experience was invaluable.  I got the chance to study a range of different subjects that weren’t available to me back home and also learnt a variety of new ways to approach my studies.

Personally, coming over and living in the UK gave me a great sense of independence and confidence.  I had such a positive experience living and studying in Exeter that it definitely led to me choosing to do my masters here as well.

What would you say are the main differences between the higher education systems of Australia and the UK?

Generally speaking, I think Australian universities are a lot more relaxed.  Not only are wearing shoes to class optional but universities are more accessible and very flexible in terms of degree structure.  For example, I studied a Bachelor of Arts which allowed me to graduate with a double major in Sociology and History and minor in Philosophy.  This was hugely important to me, as I was able to use the flexibility of an Arts degree to select subjects uniquely tailored to my own research interests and gain an interdisciplinary perspective on a variety of different social issues.

While Australian students work hard, perhaps one of the biggest differences for me was British students’ attitudes towards studying – a lot more seems to be expected of you here in terms of the amount of reading you are required to do per module and the constant emphasis on graduating with a 2:1 or above.

Could you tell us more about your experience so far with your MA in Philosophy? 

So far, my experience has been great and I am fortunate enough to have an excellent supervisor.  However, it has also been very demanding.  Due to the fact that my masters is solely research based, I have no classes or general structure to my week so it requires a lot of self-discipline and motivation!

Could you tell us more about your dissertation topic?

I am particularly interested in exploring how normative practices in Western societies shape individual moral perceptions concerning the permissibility of sexual violence towards women.  While there is a strong social and legal consensus that rape is morally wrong, there has been little philosophical research that has sought to articulate the nature of its wrongfulness.  While it seems both obvious and intuitive that rape is morally abhorrent and harmful to both individuals and society, current statistics on rape and sexual violence reveal an inherent contradiction between the grave manner in which rape is perceived culturally and the sheer prevalence with which it occurs.

How do graduate studies compare to undergraduate studies?

So far I have only handed in the first chapter of my thesis, so I don’t feel as though I can make any big comparisons yet! However, so far I think the biggest differences have been learning how to study completely independently and also adapt to working at a higher academic standard.

What are your plans upon graduation? 

I am hoping to secure a PhD position in the next few months and then pursue a career in academia.

Finally, what’s your favourite read in Philosophy?

My favourite read in Philosophy would have to be Foucault’s Discipline and Punish.

Interview with Isabelle Rogerson

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This week, we meet up with Isabelle Rogerson, a flexible-combined honours student with a focus on English and Philosophy to find out the contrast between the two subjects and her take on studying Philosophy.

Hello Isabelle, fantastic to meet you. Could you give us a little introduction about yourself?

I’m a third year student at Exeter doing English with Philosophy. I’ve always picked a broad range of modules because I hesitated between English and Philosophy and Philosophy and Science before coming to university. When I got here, in 1st year I only did English and Philosophy modules but last year I took a module in Anthropology and really enjoyed that. Last year I also did a module in Ecology. And this year I’ve taken two modules in Anthropology – Anthropology of Africa and Human-Animal Interactions.

Given that you study both English and Philosophy, what do you think the main differences are in terms of content and methods of learning?

They are very different. With English, you’ve only got 30 credit modules whereas with Philosophy you have 15 credit modules. In English most of the time you have core modules and if you are doing straight English then you will have a few more core modules too. In Philosophy there are modules for second and third years, so you get a mix of people which is good but it means you have to be quite tactical in terms of the modules you choose. I did a module last year called Symbolic Logic which was really good, I really enjoyed it but it’s not for everyone because it’s quite mathematical based. Whereas in English, there are modules specifically for second and third years.

For the actual approach that they take in Philosophy, it is very analytical and all about constructing an argument for an essay. I think for Philosophy they really value original thought. The subjects are similar in the fact that they are literary subjects where you want to read a lot of scholarship and draw from that scholarship in order to construct your own argument where you insert yourself into the debate, discuss the scholars and comment upon the text. Obviously in English it is more text based. In a section of your essay it will be closed reading which you won’t necessarily have in Philosophy. Personally I find Philosophy more challenging but also more rewarding.

In what sense is it rewarding?

You’re not limiting yourself to one book. Not that English essays make you feel constricted because you have to read a vast array of literature. Philosophy essays encourage you to come up with a fresh perspective so you can be very original. I usually feel like I have a better sense of the scholarship around the subject when I finish the Philosophy essay than the English one. But it might just be my preference for Philosophy.

Do you find yourself studying and looking at English and Philosophy differently after studying both subjects together?

I only studied Philosophy before in France, because I lived there till I was 18 and did the French scientific baccalaureate with an American option before going to university in England. Philosophy in France was very different. It was more of a case of “learn what all of these philosophers have said and repeat these to your teachers”. The first thing they tell you when you arrive in university is, “we do not want you to repeat what someone else has just taught you. We want you to think for yourselves”. What they really dislike especially in first year is people trying to make sweeping statements that sound very philosophical. In England, they want very precise arguments that logically follow each other and therefore you’ve got to be very rigorous in your reasoning. That’s the very opposite of French philosophy which is using very broad brush strokes and being quite florid with your language. It was a big change in Philosophy.

In English I have done it with an American teacher and we had spent 6 months in depth on books which is a lot longer than I would spend on a book here where you do maximum a book a week. If you’re doing an essay you’ll look at a book for maybe 2-3 weeks maximum. I felt like I had less time to go as deep and with lectures and seminars, you have to come up with your own interpretation rather than having a teacher to guide you in interpreting the book. I think overall for both subjects it’s about original and independent thought.

What are your favourite topics in Philosophy?

I like Philosophy of Science probably because I’m like a scientist who decided to do literary studies and have been constantly thinking why ever since. I really like the Philosophy of Logic as well. Symbolic logic was my favourite module. Philosophy of Science is really good in a lot of other sciences subjects. A lot of what I did in a module on Ecology, I also covered in Philosophy of Science but from a different perspective which was really interesting.

Logic is great because it can apply to anything and any subject where you have to construct an argument. If you take Law, Politics, anything where you have to construct a rigorous argument that is valid or if you want to deconstruct someone else’s argument I find it really useful. I find myself using it in an Anthropology essay. I used it in an argument in English. It applies to everything.

How will you advise fellow and prospective undergraduates whilst studying for a double degree in terms of the management of workload and difference in content?

Flexible combined honours is absolutely great! It’s great to have an interdisciplinary education. Make sure that your modules are evenly weighted in both terms. Unbalanced module distribution in your academic year means that you will work less well because you have too much to do and end up not performing as well in addition to feeling very stressed.

It’s good to choose subjects where there is a bit of an overlap or at least something in common where you can relate two subjects together. In Philosophy I chose mostly Philosophy of Science modules, and then I did Ecology and Anthropology where I managed to find common areas in all of those subjects and that’s what helped me the most in writing my essays. For instance, in Anthropology I wrote an essay on Darwin. In my Philosophy of Science module I chose a question on race because I studied Darwin. They’ll see that you’ve already got quite an in-depth knowledge which is different to others on the course which will give you a distinct advantage. It’s also interesting for you because you can delve into a very narrow field and you might find that you want to specialize in that field. For instance now I’m doing my dissertation about race and this year the modules that I have chosen in Anthropology I’ve been able to pick out the aspects that interest me. It’s being able to see the links between the modules and subjects you’re studying that are going to be most rewarding and beneficial for your degree.

You mentioned that you studied and grew up in France. What’s it like coming back to the UK and do you find that the methods of learning are different between the two countries?

Very different. The French baccalaureate was very intense. I did 10 subjects. You start at 8 and finish at 6 most days. You would have just probably one hour for lunch. Also, four hours exams. It is very different to A-Levels. In some ways it’s great because it gave me an amazing work ethic because I was having to push myself so hard. It meant that I was much better in sustaining my concentration because I was having to do four hours exams. Obviously being bilingual is a huge advantage. The fact that you do such a broad array of subjects is really useful. Even though I was doing a scientific baccalaureate Philosophy was still obligatory.

But in France the relationship between the teacher and student is very different to how it is in the universities here. It’s very much “the teacher is in control, the teacher tells you what to do and you copy what your teacher says. Learn it off by hard, repeat it to them and if you do that you’ll get a good grade.” Original thought is less valued apart from the American section in literature and history. It is a very different relationship and it’s a different way of learning. It’s much more of learning what they tell you to learn. Whereas when you come to the university, what they want you to do is to come out with your own ideas, bring your own perspective to independent research. It is a much more informal relationship with your tutors, your lecturers and you can meet up with them. I feel like when you meet up with your tutors, even though they are a senior lecturer or professor, they still make an effort to treat you as an equal and you feel like you can have a really interesting intellectual discussion with them without them being just the “teacher”. They value your ideas just as much. That’s one of my favourite things about university in England. That’s why I wanted to come here.

As a final year student, what are the challenges you anticipate as you complete the final stretch of your undergraduate degree?

Dissertation, it’s one of the big ones. I think it will be really rewarding. I once had to do a big project in France that was with one other person. It was one of the hardest things because it was completely independent research but it was also one of the most rewarding. At the end, it’s like writing a book. It’s something you’ve put together which is entirely your own ideas which is something you can be proud of and say “I did that myself”.

Another would be to either find a career or a masters. It’s going to be hard. If there are second years reading this I will say, get an internship while you can, do something useful because it will help you later on.

Do you have any advice for our fellow undergraduates in the study of Philosophy?

Choose modules that you enjoy. Try everything in first year so that you can have a good idea of what you want to do. In Philosophy, go to lectures and keep up with the readings but what worked for me was that in your essays, choose one subject to focus on and go really narrow and in-depth rather than trying to do every single reading. You wouldn’t have time and you wouldn’t be able to use half of every reading. The more knowledge you can have is obviously a good thing but given that you are restricted in the amount of time that you have, it’s better to focus your research and your studies on one area.

To cap it off, who’s your favourite philosopher?

I like Wittgenstein. I find the Philosophy of Language really interesting. It’s quite similar to logic which is why I like it. Having studied in France and being bilingual you have a much broader perspective in language and language is something we talk about when studying English.

Jason Chang

 

Seasons Greetings from your New Editors!

Welcome to Sociology, Philosophy and Anthropology (SPA) Undergraduate News! It’s almost Christmas and we thought we’d introduce you to this year’s editors of the blog – Jason Chang, Jess Wiemer and Samuel Fawcett.

Given that Christmas is around the corner, we thought we’d add in a bit of a festive cheer with some festive questions to the editors!


 

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Jason Chang

Third Year Sociology major continuing with SPA Undergraduate News this year. Jason runs Global Exe, a youth project on campus dealing with conflict resolution and cultural integration through interactive theatre. He is a massive fan of cafés and people watching, and you can often find him holding a baguette down the high street. He is also a keen hiker who recently completed several of the tallest mountains in the Swiss Alps. Check out his personal blog here: www.labohemefr.wordpress.com

Festive Question – What’s your favourite Christmas song?

A: Last Christmas by Wham! I know the lyrics sound awfully depressing, but I have quite an odd taste in music, often first liking the tunes before researching the lyrics. And this song has a great tune – if only the lyrics were as joyous!

Festive Question – What’s your favourite Christmas decoration for the home?

A: Probably some snowflakes with fairy lights in the background. I’m quite a fan of winter and snow and this creates quite a unique ambiance in the house.

Festive Question – What are you hoping for from Santa’s bag of presents this year?

A: A bag full of hiking equipment! Crampons, walking sticks, ropes etc. I eventually hope to do alpine climbing more regularly in the future, so the basic equipment for survival will be much welcomed!

 

Jess Wiemer

Jess Wiemer

Second Year BSc Anthropology major and a new addition to the SPA Undergraduate News team. Jess is the Deputy Subject Chair of Anthropology in the SSLC in which she is currently undergoing an employability Change Agents project and is a student mentor within the SPA Buddy Scheme. Originally from Canada, but now living in Belgium when she’s not over-caffeinating herself at the University of Exeter. She loves to travel and is planning to fly to Laos this summer to help at an elephant conservation and children’s school. As a lover of fine art, history, theatre and writing, you’ll often find her sipping wine at the Bike Shed or strolling through the RAMM.

Festive Question – What is your favourite Christmas tradition?

A: My family and I used to visit a Christmas tree farm in Canada every year. We’d hop onto the wagon’s hay bales and be driven out to that year’s plot, trudge through the snow to pick out our tree, and saw it down. Then we’d head back with soggy boots to be welcomed by an open fire and free hot chocolate and cookies. I miss the scent of pine needles.

Festive Question – What is your favourite winter sport?

A: Ice skating. I grew up near the Rideau Canal, which is the longest skating rink in the world and home to the best homemade maple taffy. I think I learned to skate before I could run.

Festive Question – What is your favourite Christmas film?

A: How the Grinch Stole Christmas – the original 1966 cartoon directed by Chuck Jones. I think I’ve watched it every year since birth.

 

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Samuel Fawcett

Second Year BA Sociology student and new to the SPA Undergraduate News team. Sam is one of the two Social Secretaries for the Sociology and Anthropology Society. He also studies French through the Foreign Language Centre and does an evening class in Italian. Aside from Sociology, Sam likes literature and poetry, and is a long-suffering member of the Labour Party, having worked as a Press Officer in Taunton Deane during the 2015 election. When not at university, Sam will either be found at home in Somerset, or attempting to drunkenly convey the virtues of Émile Durkheim in a local pub.

Festive Question – What is your favourite Christmas tradition?

A: Christingle. I haven’t been for ages due to the slight issue of not believing in God, but when I was younger my family and I always went to the local church on Christmas Eve and everyone would sing carols etc and then we’d get an orange with loads of sweets stuck into it on little skewers. Admittedly my sister and I went more for the sweets than anything else, but the communal feel was lovely and gave a real festive feel to the occasion.

Festive Question – What’s your favourite Christmas song?

A: ‘I Believe In Father Christmas’ by Greg Lake. It’s a very deceptive song, as it has a lovely melody and chord progression which all sounds very festive, but actually it’s a massive downer. ‘They said there’ll be snow at Christmas, they said there’ll be peace on Earth. But instead it just kept on raining: a veil of tears for the virgin birth’. Merry Christmas.

Festive Question – Quality Street or Roses?

A: Roses. Every time it’s Roses. Them or maybe the big tins of Heroes that tower over you every time you walk in to any British supermarket at Christmas.

Books to read if you’re a Philosophy student

About to start Philosophy at Exeter? Or are you a Philosophy student looking for something different? Philosophy lecturers from the department have given us their suggestions for a number of titles that inspired their interest in Philosophy:

Dr Edward Skidelsky: The Great Philosophers by Bryan Magee

“A chatty introduction to the history of Western philosophy, based on a series of television interviews conducted by Magee in the 1980s. Very clear and readable”.

Professor Michael Hauskeller: The Philosopher’s Dog by Raimond Gaita 

“A great read on the nature of the mind, about what it means to be a human and an animal, and how we can understand each other”.

Dr Staffan Müller-Wille: Discovering Plato by Alexandre Koyré 

“He not only explains Plato’s philosophy very well, but at the same time raises the question of what philosophy actually is about”.

Dr Joel Krueger: Zen Action, Zen Person by Thomas P. Kasulis 

“This book awakened my interest in Zen Buddhism – and non-western philosophy more generally – and serves as an important reminder that profound philosophical resources exist outside the standard Western canon”.

 Professor David Inglis: No Exit, and Three Other Plays by Jean-Paul Sartre

“Jean-Paul Sartre wrote plays andnovels to introduce readers to his philosophy ofexistentialism, which in turn drew upon earlier major philosophers. These plays are an enjoyable introduction to central themes in French and German philosophy, and are absorbing to read in their own right, as they contain intense dramatic situations”.

 

Gemma Joyce

Philosophy: The student experience

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Philosophy finalist Gemma Joyce shares her experiences of studying at Exeter.

Studying Philosophy and Sociology at the University of Exeter has been great fun and has massively complemented my choice of a career in journalism.

At the end of my second year I became editor of Exeter’s award winning student paper, Exeposé – something I’d definitely recommend getting involved in. If you’re interested in the media, Exeter has a wide range of student publications from academic journals to music magazines. We also have radio and television production societies, but the opportunities aren’t just limited to Exeter – my experience at Exeposé proved hugely helpful in my applications for work experience elsewhere and I successfully got placements at The Times, The Guardian and The Huffington Post while studying – something the department was very supportive of.

My degree’s flexible hours helped fit my time around the demands of running the paper and doing regular essays and exams really helped to hone my writing skills. Moving forward, I’m going to do a Masters in Newspaper Journalism at City University London, the best course available for trainee journalists in the country – something I couldn’t do without my degree from Exeter.

Gemma Joyce, BA Philosophy and Sociology, Year 3

An introduction to the Philosophy Society

Dan Mason, President of the Philosophy Society, offers you an introduction to what you can expect in the coming year.

The Philosophy Society is unique because of the nature of the subject. Since philosophy provides the foundation (obviously or not) to all human intellectual endeavor, the Society is uniquely placed to offer speakers on a wide variety of topics and to collaborate with a wide variety of other societies and groups. It is an incredibly tight-knit group, and a very friendly and welcoming one.

As a fresher I went to nearly all the Philosophy Society events and became friends with the committee and the regular attendees. The Exmouth beach event at the end of Freshers’ Week was very enjoyable, and helped me to get to know the other members better.

I found that I had such a wonderful time with people, and such a passion to see the Society succeed that I wanted to be in a position where I could try to make that happen, so I decided to run for President, and was elected this year.

In the coming year I want to see the Society grow, to see more people coming to our events and socials and also see more people contributing to our THINK! journal. The Society will definitely involve a wide variety of speakers and social events alongside more intellectual debate and work amongst those that feel confident enough to do so.

Above all, expect a warm and friendly atmosphere where your opinion is counted, even if it isn’t agreed with, which let’s be honest is why philosophy exists.

You can find the Philosophy Society on Facebook here and Twitter here.

 

Gemma Joyce