November 28th, 2013 | Category: Beginner's Guides, E. coli, iGEM, Microbiology, Saccharomyces, Synthetic Biology | Leave a comment

Synthetic Biology & its Application

As promised here are a few notes and links on the key points of today’s lecture: Synthetic Biology and its Application (28th November 2013). Follow the links for further information. Synthetic Biology – it’s not what you do, it’s the way that you do it. Three key aims of synthetic biology were highlighted: the first […]

December 3rd, 2012 | Category: Mathematics, Metabolic engineering, Microbiology | Leave a comment

Synthetic Biology PhD positions at Exeter

Any recent graduates or undergraduates in their final year looking for PhD positions in synthetic biology, take note: there are six synthetic biology PhD studentships available at the University of Exeter looking at biomethane-producing microbial communities (BMCs).

March 20th, 2012 | Category: Microbiology, Saccharomyces, Video | Leave a comment

Magnetic yeast – from the Oscillator

Christina Agapakis (aka Oscillator) discusses a recent paper from Pam Silver’s lab in this post, “magnetic yeast“.

March 9th, 2012 | Category: Fungi, Microbiology, Papers | One comment

Plastic-eating fungi

Biology is the raw material for synthetic biology. In this paper, ‘Biodegradation of polyester polyurethane by endophytic fungi‘ published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, the authors describe fungal isolates from the Ecuadorian rainforest with the potential for bioremediation.

February 27th, 2012 | Category: Beginner's Guides, Ethics, Health, iGEM, Microbiology, Multimedia, Synthetic Biology, Video | Leave a comment

Creating life – the ultimate engineering challenge

Here’s a documentary and introduction to synthetic biology and the iGEM competition. The film follows the ParaSight iGEM project from Imperial College London 2010.

January 4th, 2012 | Category: Blogs, Microbiology | Leave a comment

The online, arsenic lab. book

There was plenty of controversy generated at the end of 2010 by the suggestion that a particular Halophilic bacteria (GFA-J1) could incorporate arsenic into DNA in place of phosphorous. But perhaps the most interesting outcome was not the research itself, but the online response.