The ‘Inverted Pyramid’ web content model

You have about two seconds to ‘hook’ your reader – so the first words on your page and the structure of your copy is incredibly important.

A technique called the inverted pyramid can be used to structure your copy in a way that puts the most important information at the top and the less essential at the bottom. This means if someone only reads half your page they still leave having consumed your key messages.

Eye tracking studies have shown that people spend more time looking at the top left of a page – the place your profile picture is usually displayed on social media sites. They read the first few words of the first paragraph; if that doesn’t hook them they will read the first few words of the second paragraph. If they still aren’t interested they will leave for another website.

Using the inverted pyramid encourages you to put the most important information first (where people are most likely to see it) – this includes the who, what, where, when, why and how – then the more general (or background) information further down.

Inverted pyramid

Inverted pyramid for web writing

The inverted pyramid analogy shows that the points in your copy are made in descending order of importance.

The inverted pyramid was originally (and still is) used by journalists to give structure to news stories. It means a reader can stop reading when they have satisfied their curiosity without worrying that something is being held back. It also meant that, back in the days of having to typeset newspaper pages, sub-editors could cut the bottom off a story without losing any essential information.

Jenna Richards
Web and Digital Communications Officer (Research)

 

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