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  1. Darren Davies
    Darren Davies 13th Dec, 2010 at 4:25 pm | |

    There is a difference in the ‘way’ people access web content now using touchscreen devices, which is revolutionising web interface design. Your extensive experience using a tablet is based on single point pen input, not multi-touch. The ‘way’ is most important, not the ‘how’.

    It is also clear that widescreen is the predominant screen ratio (although the iPad is actually 16:10. I would expect 1280×800 to be at the top of the list), however I don’t know if there is a tablet available that uses this resolution, were you attempting to “see just how much other tablets may or may not have been used over the years”, doesn’t this mean that laptops should be excluded from the stats if you are looking at tablet stats?

    Are there any other indicators that could be used to identify the difference between mouse/touch/pen input?

    These are important figures, showing that we really need to think about web design in both portrait and landscape, as devices easily rotate nowadays. There is no wrong or right way to hold it, after all. However, I almost always use my iPad in landscape mode for web browsing at 1024×768.

    Very interesting article, more research needed.

  2. Dale P
    Dale P 4th Jan, 2011 at 5:01 pm | |

    Really interesting article. I remember my first HTML pages back in the day were always designed for 800*600. Guess most of them would look a bit, well ‘sparse’ on a vast majority of today’s screens judging by the stats.

    Interesting analysis about students’ use of laptops. When I was a student (05-09) I don’t think any of my friends had desktops at all, so I would suspect a 95%+ use of widescreen resolutions after excluding visits from staff and cluster pcs.

    One small caveat tho – widescreen ratios seem to be increasingly common on desktop pc monitors too nowadays, so perhaps it’s becoming less easy to distinguish desktops from laptops in the first place???

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