Flora Stewart – Community Wellbeing Champion

Flora Stewart is Community Wellbeing Champion for Bedfordshire Rural Communities Charity. In 2016 she graduated from the University of Exeter in BA Sociology and Anthropology.

Flora Stewart, Community Wellbeing Champion for Bedfordshire Rural Communities Charity.

Thinking about careers can sometimes feel overwhelming, so this week we’re partnering with our friends in Wellbeing to bring you a range of career-focused sessions on the topics you’ve told us are the most stressful.

What have you been doing since leaving Exeter, and what are you doing now? 

I graduated from Exeter in 2016, and started working part time at Marks and Spencer’s whilst volunteering with Young Carers, and gaining IT certificates as I wasn’t confident with Excel and wanted to apply for administrative positions.

I then started paid employment at Carers in Bedfordshire in December 2018 as Dementia Services Activity Organiser within which I carried out administrative duties, events and activity organisation, hosted events and activities, facilitated and led therapeutic and social sessions for people living with dementia and their family/friend carers. There was a lot of communication and liaison with other local charities, organisations and services including Age UK, Fire Service, and Memory Assessment Service.

I started a new role in March 2022 as Community Wellbeing Champion, delivering Social Prescribing in Bedford. I work for the charity Bedfordshire Rural Communities Charity (BedsRCC) and am the Social Prescriber for two local surgeries, taking referrals from GPs and other healthcare professionals to help support people in linking them to their local community to help them improve their health and wellbeing. I completed a Foundation Certificate in Psychodynamic Counselling in July 2022. 

“I wanted the opportunity to support people to connect to their community and its projects, groups, services so that they can live as well as possible.”

Why did you choose this career? And what do you enjoy most about your work? 

Studying Sociology and Anthropology helped develop my understanding of the wider determinants of health and wellbeing. I wanted the opportunity to support people to connect to their community and its projects, groups, services so that they can live as well as possible. I have seen friends and family been discharged from the more traditional health services and not be given further support other than medication. Social Prescribing acknowledges that other changes can be made in a person’s live to improve their health and I think this holistic approach is logical and the future of healthcare and I wanted to be involved. 

What did you enjoy most about your programme and what was the biggest highlight? 

Anthropology modules were so eye-opening and helped expand mindsets and question perspectives consistently. I enjoyed most when we were challenged to think differently about our culture in relation to other cultures, particularly when these challenges broke down ideas of Western ‘superiority’ or the idea of Western culture as the norm vs just one of the many cultures.

There were great opportunities for discussion particularly within modules run by Anthropology lecturer named Hannah (Human-Animal Interactions, my dissertation tutor) and Tom (first year core Anthropology modules lecturer). The fieldtrip to Skanda Vale Ashram was brilliant. 

Why did you choose to study at Exeter? 

I made a list of my top 5 options and put a tick against categories such as ‘social life’, ‘course’, ‘location’, ‘entry requirements’ and Exeter came out as having the most positive marks, so I put it as my first choice. I felt confident in the quality of teaching I would receive and the overall experience I would have, partly because of its status and also because of positive reviews on review sites and league tables. The city was somewhere my family had lived before and I knew one or two people who had gone to the University and had a positive experience. 

What skills and experiences have been most useful for your career? 

Cultural awareness and sensitivity particularly from Anthropology modules which gave a rich and varied opportunity to look outwardly at cultures different to that which I had grown up within but with plenty of opportunity to reflect inwardly at my own perceptions and viewpoints that I had gathered throughout life so far.

This has been very helpful because I work in a culturally diverse town with service users from many different backgrounds and walks of life. I feel open to listening to everyone as an individual, and make time for reflecting on my own interactions with the situation to make sure I acknowledge what I am aware of and what I need to work on in terms of my learning.

“By getting involved in opportunities such as Grand Challenges and The Exeter Award, I developed my interpersonal skills and this has been really useful for confidence with connecting with colleagues throughout my career so far.”

I feel studying modules including Disability and Society which introduced concepts such as ‘people are not disabled, it is their environment that disables them’ has been an ongoing encouragement to consider different angles when it comes to other people and my own wellbeing. By getting involved in opportunities such as Grand Challenges and The Exeter Award, I developed my interpersonal skills and this has been really useful for confidence with connecting with colleagues throughout my career so far. 

What advice would you give to a current student who wishes to pursue your career? 

Make the most of opportunities for discussion and reflective thought within your modules to make sure you’re challenging your viewpoints, as you will need to be able to be open to new perspectives and ways of seeing the world in any job that is focussed on working with and supporting others.

Attend extra talks and lectures that interest you. If someone has an interesting job, ask them how they got there. Make the most of online learning options to boost your skills and knowledge such as FutureLearn. If you have time, get volunteering – anything and anything that sounds remotely interesting to you can leave you with a wealth of experiences to draw from.

“Learning to balance life and ‘work’/study is so useful for your future and especially in a line of work where you are hearing a lot of people’s struggles and challenges, you must have space outside of work that is for you and keeps you well whilst you are supporting others.”

I recommend all students treating their week like a working week and studying wherever suits you best roughly between 9-5 with a good lunch and coffee break or two. Then make the most of evenings and weekends to socialise and explore the beautiful city and surrounding areas you’re in! You will not regret it. Learning to balance life and ‘work’/study is so useful for your future and especially in a line of work where you are hearing a lot of people’s struggles and challenges, you must have space outside of work that is for you and keeps you well whilst you are supporting others.

Get involved in as many societies as you are interested in – especially in first and second years when you might have more time than final years. This is so you have chance to mix with people outside of your course and accommodation, and try out different interests – as you will want to do this throughout life.  

What are your plans for the future? 

I would like to learn British Sign Language and gain a TEFL qualification so that I can steer my career towards helping others communicate. I would then consider either teaching BSL / TEFL to others or using these skills, combined with my other job experiences, to work in advocacy or accessible counselling. 

My Career in Translation – Wing Sze Hung

Wing Sze Hung Graduated from the University of Exeter in MA International Relations, 2016.

Wing Sze Hung University of Exeter Alumn, and Official Languages Officer for the Fire Services Department, Hong Kong Special Administrative Government.

She’s currently Official Languages Officer for the Fire Services Department, Hong Kong Special Administrative Government.

What have you been doing since leaving Exeter, and what are you doing now?  

I joined FILA Hong Kong in Feb 2019 as a translator/interpreter for the Irish Design Director, then became an Official Languages Officer of the Hong Kong Government in Sep 2019 and have been working under the Fire Services Department until now.

My main duties include translating articles from Chinese to English and vice versa, vetting Chinese and English materials, and drafting Chinese apothegms/couplets. I also work for the Duty Lawyer Service after office hours to provide interpretation while foreign lawyers offer their legal advice to non-English speaking residents. 

“Although it may sound boring to keep translating/refining articles everyday, I can put my hands on different materials ranging from lighthearted promotional leaflets to professional operational manuals, so much fun indeed!”

Why did you choose this career? And what do you enjoy most about your work?  

I did my bachelor degree in translation in Hong Kong and I always enjoy working with languages. I worked for a private translation company before travelling to Exeter. I applied for the post of Official Languages Officer after graduation in Oct 2018.

I got an offer after passing a series of written test, sight translation test and interview. I enjoy the variety of jobs I am exposed to in my current position. Although it may sound boring to keep translating/refining articles everyday, I can put my hands on different materials ranging from lighthearted promotional leaflets to professional operational manuals, so much fun indeed! I also have two supportive supervisors and a team of superb colleagues. 

What did you enjoy most about your programme and what was the biggest highlight?  

Back when I was doing my bachelor degree, study life was quite relaxing and stress-free. In contrast, doing a MA in International Relations was tough, especially in the first Term, when I found it hard to complete all the weekly readings but I had to do so or else I would not be able to join the class discussions.

That said, I enjoyed having to be so hard working, because it proved I had made a right decision to leave my family, travel such a long way and pay a relative high tuition fee to study abroad. The biggest highlight was that I was “trained” to be more expressive in classes. In Hong Kong the lecturer/professor was the main speaker and students would not even raise questions in class, but in Exeter the lecturer/professor was more like a moderator who facilitated class discussions and raised new insights/challenges to students.

I remember being the only non-European student in Dr. Alex Prichard’s “Power and Institution” (still not a compulsory course back then), he often invited me to share my views in class, which freaked me out because I could not really understand the reading materials and I was afraid that I would say something wrong. I want to thank Alex for probably unknowingly pushing me to be a better self, if he never had encouraged me to speak up, I would just remain silent in class and learn much less than I could.

Another highlight was the learning environment in class and after-class. I heard from my housemate that many of the students in the Business School were Chinese, but in the Politics departments, I was happily the minority and got a chance to submerge in a fully-English learning environment. My proficiency in English, no matter written or oral, has significantly increased, and it is a life-long benefit to my career development. My classmates are all very friendly. 

“The knowledge and theories in International Relations may not be directly related to my career today, but my writing, critical-thinking, communication and inter-personal skills have all advanced from my time in Exeter.”

What skills and experiences have been most useful for your career?  

The knowledge and theories in International Relations may not be directly related to my career today, but my writing, critical-thinking, communication and inter-personal skills have all advanced from my time in Exeter. The former two have been particularly useful for my career since my main duties are exactly to write and to improve other’s writing.

Having written a number of essays in Exeter and received constructive comments from my lecturers, I could spot out most of the problems in the articles handed over to us for our vetting, including unclear and illogical writing and bad English usage, then reorganise the ideas and put them back on the right track. As for the latter two, they are essential for me to maintain a close working relationship with my colleagues and communicate my ideas with officers from other divisions. 

“Nearly everyone in the translation field can write well, but not a lot are confident and skilled enough to interpret. It will definitely be a bonus if you can handle consecutive and even simultaneous interpretation.”

What advice would you give to a current student who wishes to pursue your career?  

Strengthen your fundamental language skills, especially oral communication. Nearly everyone in the translation field can write well, but not a lot are confident and skilled enough to interpret. It will definitely be a bonus if you can handle consecutive and even simultaneous interpretation. Be prepared at all times. 

What are your plans for the future?  

I will remain serving the Fire Services Department for a year, then get posted to another Government Department. This appears to be a clear and reliable path for me but I am also trying to look for overseas job opportunities in face of the changing environment in Hong Kong. 

Josh Brown, Academy Analyst, Arsenal FC

Josh Brown, Exeter alumn and Academy Analyst, Arsenal FC.

Josh Brown graduated with BA (Hons) Politics, Philosophy and Economics in 2020. He’s currently Academy Analyst for Arsenal FC.*

What have you been doing since leaving Exeter, and what are you doing now? 

Since leaving Exeter, I completed an MSc in Sports Performance Analysis at the University of Chichester alongside work at Millwall Football Club, before being recruited to join AFC Bournemouth as an Academy Analyst. My job essentially is to support academy footballers across the age groups by providing statistical and video analysis of fixtures and training, and with the full-time pros, helping to acclimatise them in an elite sporting environment by providing pre- and post-match analysis of opposition and fixtures.  

“I always loved sport, and I knew I wanted a job that was dynamic, fast-paced and rewarding – and football analysis matched this up with my academic strengths”

Why did you choose this career? And what do you enjoy most about your work? 

I always loved sport, and I knew I wanted a job that was dynamic, fast-paced and rewarding – and football analysis matched this up with my academic strengths, so seemed a natural progression from my undergraduate degree. I love the fact that my work involves such close contact with professional players and coaches – I find myself questioning a lot of what I assumed to be true about football after conversations at work – and as a result, that I can feel myself developing my knowledge of the elite game rapidly. In such a tight-knit environment, relationships with players is fundamental to any success, and I consider myself very fortunate that I’ve worked with brilliant sets of players across both clubs I’ve been at. 

“I find myself questioning a lot of what I assumed to be true about football after conversations at work – and as a result, that I can feel myself developing my knowledge of the elite game rapidly.”

Were a member of any societies, groups or sports clubs? 

I was part of Exeter University Men’s Cricket Club for two seasons, playing BUCS fixtures in the summer, and was also Sports Editor at Exeposé for two years. I was also fortunate enough to work for Exeter City FC in a voluntary media capacity, which was fantastic exposure into professional football and I was lucky enough to meet people at the Club who shaped my career ambitions.  

What did you enjoy most about your programme and what was the biggest highlight? 

I enjoyed that I was able to study such a variety of modules – I studied everything from the Philosophy of the Body and Mind to the Changing Character of Warfare. It allowed me to pursue my own interests, and studying three academic perspectives simultaneously meant I developed an ability to understand topics through a multi-disciplinary approach – something I’ve found invaluable in my professional working life.  

 What did you enjoy most about studying at Exeter? 

The best thing for me about studying at Exeter was that I could get everything I wanted out of the University experience – the academic side was as challenging as I wanted it to be, but I also had the time to pursue my extra-curricular interests such as playing competitive sport. Being able to work in world-leading facilities on Streatham campus was an experience I won’t ever forget. 

“Being able to approach topics from a multi-disciplinary perspective has been essential in my work; being able to examine player development across a spectrum of spheres – from sports science, to coaching, to analysis and education – has given me a really well-rounded platform to for my job.”

What skills and experiences have been most useful for your career? 

Being able to approach topics from a multi-disciplinary perspective has been essential in my work; being able to examine player development across a spectrum of spheres – from sports science, to coaching, to analysis and education – has given me a really well-rounded platform to for my job. I also find the analytical process that my experience at Exeter helped develop has been important in helping me place football in the wider social sphere – it was a topic I explored in my dissertation, but find myself constantly referring to in debates about football. 

What advice would you give to a current student who wishes to pursue your career? 

Firstly, get networking – LinkedIn is absolutely vital in accessing others in elite sport, who typically aren’t as publicly available as (for example) big firms in other industries, who likely have graduate schemes or other programmes that provide a pathway into employment. Football can be a very nepotistic industry to work in and without connections it’s almost impossible to get anywhere! Secondly, get writing – football analysis in particular is – for me – about being able to say 100 things about 1 team, not 1 thing about 100 teams. The best way to explore these ideas is longer-form writing, ideally integrating data, video and visuals into articles. I read a lot outside of my working hours, and I know staff at other clubs who have been hired off the back of their self-published work – so it’s the best way of getting noticed. Most of the time, it’s not necessarily about the argument you’re making, but how you make it. 

“Firstly, get networking – LinkedIn is absolutely vital in accessing others in elite sport. Football can be a very nepotistic industry to work in and without connections it’s almost impossible to get anywhere! Secondly, get writing – football analysis in particular is – for me – about being able to say 100 things about 1 team, not 1 thing about 100 teams.”

What are your plans for the future? 

I want to progress into working within an elite first-team environment in the Premier League, or another elite European league.

*At the time of writing this content Josh was working for AFC Bournemouth, but moved to Arsenal FC in September 2022. Congrats on your new job!

Alumni Profile – Issa Belmond Thullah, Research and Security Analyst, Office of National Security, Sierra Leone

Issa Belmond Thullah, Exeter Alumn and current Research and Security Analyst, Office of National Security, Sierra Leone.

Issa Belmond Thullah graduated from the University of Exeter in MA Applied Security and Strategy, 2020. He’s currently Research and Security Analyst, Office of National Security, Sierra Leone.

What have you been doing since leaving Exeter, and what are you doing now?  

When I left Exeter, I returned home to work for the Office of National Security which is the main coordinating outfit within the security sector, and advises the President of the country on national security matters. Currently, I am contributing to the wider security sector efforts to prepare for, and respond effectively to, threats and hazards that impact on the peace and safety of communities in Sierra Leone. 

“I choose this career because of my past. Between 1991 and 2002, Sierra Leone suffered a brutal civil war that devastated the country to almost irreparable proportions. I was always striving to make a change in my country that will help to resuscitate the lives of those who were affected by the war and to ensure that such does not repeat itself.”

Why did you choose this career? And what do you enjoy most about your work?  

I choose this career because of my past. Between 1991 and 2002, Sierra Leone suffered a brutal civil war that devastated the country to almost irreparable proportions. The war left 50,000 dead and 20,000 mutilated, while three quarters of the population displaced. I witnessed my country crumbled and succumbed to the atrocities of the war. Lodged with this experience, I was always striving to make a change in my country that will help to resuscitate the lives of those who were affected by the war and to ensure that such does not repeat itself. This is why I decided to work in the security sector to help stabilize the country and create the enabling environment for peace and development to thrive. What I enjoyed most about my job is working with diverse people and changing society for the better. 

“The course is exceptional not just because of its rich academic package, but also the noteworthy field trips and experience sharing by practitioners, offered by external speakers.”

What did you enjoy most about your programme and what was the biggest highlight?  

What I enjoyed most about the MA Applied Security and Strategy programme is the perfect dialogue between theory and practice. The course is exceptional not just because of its rich academic package, but also the noteworthy field trips and experience sharing by practitioners, offered by external speakers. Students are availed the opportunity to apply their knowledge in real life situations and get their career ready. My biggest highlight is the field trips to the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI) in London and Allied Rapid Reaction Corps (ARRC) in Gloucestershire. 

What skills and experiences have been most useful for your career?  

The field of security and strategy is dynamic enough to accommodate a variety of skills and competencies. However, those I consider most useful are adaptability and problem solving, leadership and administration, innovation and strong work ethic, critical thinking, communication, organization and time-management, data analysis, project design and management.  

“Use your time at the University to engage as much as you can with materials and people to hone your skills and get your career ready.”

What advice would you give to a current student who wishes to pursue your career?  

Chosen security and strategy is a great choice. Use your time at the University to engage as much as you can with materials and people to hone your skills and get your career ready. The field of security and strategy offers many career opportunities with satisfactory experience. One is assured of employment in the government, think-tanks, defence and intelligence industry, companies engaged in security research and analysis, non-profit organisations etc. There is so much prospect to grow and live your dreams. 

What are your plans for the future?  

In the long run, my goal is to move up the hierarchy of the national security sector architecture and be part of the highest bodies for the consideration and determination of matters of security and development in my country. Also, I intend to pursue an academic career as university professor. 

Module Choice – Learning for Teaching

Hi, my name is Connor Thompson, and I am currently undertaking a PGCE at the University of Exeter. I completed my undergraduate degree at Exeter studying Exercise and Sports Science. 

Connor Thompson, current PGCE student at the University of Exeter

With teaching as a possible career choice, the “Learning for Teaching” module certainly stood out as a “must pick”. The “Learning for Teaching” module gave me the opportunity to observe and experience quality teaching in a local school of my choice. Alongside this, the learning for teaching module provided me with critical research practice and exposed educational theories that shape school policies, teaching practices and the curriculum today. This module gave me insight into the expectations of educational writing styles and this has helped me throughout my PGCE assignments. Picking this module supported my decision in choosing a Primary PGCE because it gave me the practice and experience I needed.

“Picking this module supported my decision in choosing a Primary PGCE because it gave me the practice and experience I needed.”

The “Learning for Teaching” module helped me to find out what I wanted in my teaching career. Before starting the module, I was convinced that I would be a Secondary school PE teacher with all my focus on that. However, deciding to gain some experience in a Primary school completely shifted my focus and truly broadened my perspective of what teaching and learning can be. My placement in a Primary school played a vital role in deciding how my future would look, and helped me in my decision to embark on a Primary PGCE.

“I built up the confidence to read to the class, I learnt how to manage low level disruptive behaviour and I developed a competent level of understanding around phonics.”

My “Learning for Teaching” placement, for me, was the most valuable part of the module. Although this may sound insignificant at first, having the opportunity to be an adult at the front of the class really opened my eyes to the role I could play in society and the local community. I built up the confidence to read to the class, I learnt how to manage low level disruptive behaviour and I developed a competent level of understanding around phonics. Most importantly, I experienced having a professional relationship with other members of staff and having a professional role within the classroom. In terms of subject knowledge, I was exposed to the National Curriculum and the fraction of it that was taught during my placement. This small exposure to the content, for me, was only an insight compared to the wealth of knowledge I am now gaining during my PGCE. However, this small exposure was eye-opening and one of the reasons why I chose to do a primary PGCE.

“The University lecturers on the “Learning for Teaching” module are overwhelmingly supportive and truly strive for you to be an amazing teacher one day.”

Within the module there were a range of topics covered including the Purpose of Education, Social Disadvantage, Dialogic Teaching, EAL, SEND, Assessment, Using Technology in the Classroom and Reflective Practice. I valued these modules because they exposed me to information about education that you never normally think about. However, the standout topic for me was English as an Additional Language. The EAL topic especially, has helped me during my placement in considering alternative ways to teach and develop my planning for an EAL pupil.

The University lecturers on the “Learning for Teaching” module are overwhelmingly supportive and truly strive for you to be an amazing teacher one day. Choosing to do a PGCE at the University of Exeter continued my professional and supportive relationship with the university staff, thus ensuring no student is isolated during the start of their teaching career.

“My career aspirations are to be a class teacher at first and then progress to be a co-ordinator of an academy trust or equivalent, then potentially one day to be a head-teacher.”

I am currently on my first placement completing a primary PGCE with mathematics at the University of Exeter. I am now teaching upper KS2 across the National Curriculum from Maths and English to Art and History plus many more subjects. I am currently planning, delivering, marking and reflecting on my practice every day and this is now a part of who I am. An additional part of the PGCE course is giving me the opportunity to complete two M-level assignments. This is currently helping me critically evaluate research literature and educational theories. The studies I have completed so far have influenced my pedagogical knowledge and the way I teach, specifically creatively.

My career aspirations are to be a class teacher at first and then progress to be a co-ordinator of an academy trust or equivalent, then potentially one day to be a head-teacher.

Find out more about the Learning for Teaching module https://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/education/study/teachingexperience/

For info and advice about all Online Module Selection options https://www.exeter.ac.uk/students/infopoints/yourinfopointservices/oms/

How to Use your Law Degree in Canada with Kanon Clifford

Kanon Clifford, Exeter Graduate and Associate Lawyer, Bergeron Clifford LLP, Ontario

Home country – Canada

Studied – LLB Law, 2018

Career – Associate Lawyer, Bergeron Clifford LLP

Where do you currently live and work? 

Since leaving Exeter, I have been working at one of Canada’s Top 10 Injury law boutique firms. I work with catastrophically injured individuals and help them navigate a complicated and often confusing legal system across Ontario, Canada’s largest Province. As a lawyer in Ontario, I work both in the courtroom and outside. I am a Barrister and Solicitor. I ensure injured clients receive the best possible assistance during the litigation of their injury claims.

Why did you choose to pursue this career?

The ability to make meaningful changes in people’s lives is what attracts me to this career. I work with some of the most vulnerable individuals in the legal system and helping them overcome their injuries and obtain fair compensation brings me enjoyment. Witnessing someone leave my office with a smile after a catastrophic injury brought them to me makes each long day of work worth every bit. I enjoy navigating complex legal issues and the personability of the profession.

Why did you choose to study at the University of Exeter?

I was brought to Exeter by the allure of studying in the English countryside. Coming from Canada, I was looking for a new experience balanced with a University with a strong academic track record. Exeter offered a wonderful English experience without the high cost of living in London and the chance to attend a Russell Group University with a solid academic ranking. The campus was beautiful, the students were friendly, and I had the chance to make life-long friends from all around the globe and all walks of life. Exeter was the perfect match.

Why did you choose your particular degree subject?

I enjoyed the close-knit community Exeter Law School offered and the wonderful staff who always had time for a quick chat. No matter how busy the facility was, they always had time to chat and offer helpful advice.

How did your degree help you prepare for the position you are in now?

Skills: Problem-solving, teamwork and a strong ability to listen. Experiences: Negotiation and advocacy competitions offered by the student law society and debates offered by the Debating Society offered a unique insight into contemporary issues facing access to justice and the ability to practice before using these skills in practice. Working with international students in my seminars and study group also offered a unique perspective on how to deal with individuals whose experiences and knowledge differ from my own.

Please tell us about the application process for your graduate job, and how you prepared and/or managed this?

Becoming a lawyer in my jurisdiction meant that there was a practical training portion for obtaining a legal job. This practical training is called Articling. During the Articling process here in Ontario, Canada for wannabe lawyers, you will often be assessed for your compatibility for a role with a legal practitioner, law firm or in-house counsel. This process involved legal research, attending court and interacting with clients. At the end of this practical training, most Articling students will either be offered a job with their legal mentor or not.

I was able to prepare for this by finding great legal mentors and individuals who took time to train me. Be friendly and helpful. Do not be afraid to reach out to someone who you find interesting. A friendly message or a casual meeting can go a long way.

Did you use the Career Zone whilst at Exeter? If so, what especially helped?

I did! I particularly found the Exeter Award and Exeter Leaders Award provided by the Career Zone as useful talking points when discussing my credentials with individuals in my home country. I obtained both and had a great opportunity to obtain highly relevant employment information for the current hiring markets!

What aspects of your UK university education worked in your favour during the application process?

This answer is unique to those interested in pursuing a legal career in Canada. From my personal experience, lawyers and legal professionals are intrigued with the unique dichotomy of the barrister / solicitor professions in the UK. Through Exeter’s law school, I was able to connect with both barristers and solicitors in practice and had the opportunity to shadow them. This also provided some of the coolest opportunities to see the practical side of the law outside of the classroom. In many encounters with legal professions here in Canada, this is one of the main talking points I rely on because there is that level of intrigue.

What did you do at university that you think gave you a competitive advantage in the job market in your home-country?

During my time at Exeter, I was a member of the student law society, The Exeter Law Review and the Debating Society.

What were the biggest obstacles in gaining a graduate job in your home-country?

Returning to Canada with a foreign degree undeniably creates questions for any graduate recruiter. Why were they abroad? How did they do this? What was their reason? The biggest obstacle one faces in gaining a graduate job with foreign credentials is explaining their purposes and reason for going abroad. This is an obstacle but one that can be easily overcome. Knowing your story and articulating your reasons will get you over this hurdle. Marcus Aurelius wrote, “There are brambles in the path? Then go around them. That’s all you need to know. Nothing more.” Years after writing this, his reasoning still stands. Know yourself to overcome the brambles!

What do you know now that you wish you knew when you were applying for opportunities?

To keep fighting the good fight and never stop learning.

What is your advice for any international student seeking a legal career in Canada? If you are looking to become a practicing lawyer in North America, affability is a quality that employers look for. Are you friendly, are you hardworking, are you a team player? When you go in for an interview, a significant emphasis is placed on how much the interviewer likes you. Put a smile on your face, be prepared for an open discussion, not just question-answer talk, and look to show you are a quality candidate. Be personable, show passion and show hard work and dedication. Do this, and you will go far.

End of interview.

Our alumni networks are available to help you socially and professionally now and in the future. You can connect with them whilst you are a student to take advantage of their support when you are back home during holiday season, and of course, reach out to them when you graduate.

The Alumni Office organise regular virtual employability events, which are a useful resource both for graduates and current students. For a full listing of events, please click here, and to watch historic records, please click here.

Social Media for Charities – Start Your Career With Pathways

Zoe Allen, MA in Conflict, Security and Development, and part-time Communications Manager

Zoe Allen is a current Exeter student studying for an MA in Conflict, Security and Development. Last year she took part in the Pathways to Charity and Development programme. Due to COVID-19, the programme was converted to a remote internship opportunity, with students undertaking internships in a variety of roles across a wide range of companies. 

I’m Zoe and I completed my Professional Pathways Internship with SAFE, a national domestic abuse charity based in Exeter as a Social Media Intern. After my internship ended, I was offered extended part-time freelance work managing their social media.

You can see the content I produced for SAFE on their Instagram page, and I managed their Facebook and Twitter accounts as well.

Outline the project you worked on during your Pathways remote internship. What achievements are you particularly proud of? 

As Social Media Intern for SAFE, I took a completely independent lead on the content and strategy of their social media platforms, drawing on my own experience and examples from the sector. No specialist had ever been employed for this before by SAFE, and the social media had all been handled by the team of therapists at SAFE who had limited understanding and even more limited time to handle social media. This meant it was disjointed, outdated and lacked storytelling. I helped organise the platforms so that they were better branded with more recognisable handles and logos and greatly increased the quality and quantity of content on the platform, as well as replying to comments and messages to help survivors access care.

I also expanded my skills by working on analytics tracking reports for SAFE’s board of directors, and creating SAFE’s first ever marketing and communications Branding and Tone of Voice document, to help the charity to continue to create content after I stop working for them.

I’m particularly proud of how I handled the learning curve that my work required in terms of learning more about domestic abuse and the services available in the UK. I started knowing absolutely nothing about the subject and have since written posts about trauma-led therapy, types of abuse and how to recognise them, and information about boundaries and healthy relationships.

How has your Professional Pathways internship helped you in taking the next steps in your career?

As I mentioned, the internship itself turned into an extended paid role which was of course fantastic for me financially and meant that I had a more extended and impressive experience to add to my CV.

The internship was also essential in me securing a permanent part time job with a fantastic refugee charity called Breadwinners, as their Communications Manager. It can get a little complicated doing both, and once I did post a picture of bread to SAFE’s account, which probably confused some people!

Anyway, my work with SAFE provided me with a tangible example of my social media skills (although I had already developed these a lot through volunteering projects, I can’t stress how important it is to do this too of you want to go into this area) and with valuable experience of working in the charity sector that really made my CV stand out.

Working with SAFE has also helped me learn a lot more about the sector, and working with a range of charities makes it clear where there are gaps in the charity sector where valuable work could be done. I have read a lot of articles about domestic abuse recently and discovered there is a real shortage of specialist care for refugee and migrant women, who are often asked for proof they are legally in the UK before they are offered help. There’s also a lack of specialist domestic abuse services for the LGBTQ+ community, and domestic abuse spaces are rife with transphobia. Both these issues need to be addressed.

Therefore, my work with SAFE has been essential to helping me work out where I want to work within the charity sector and that I’d love to one day lead a charity that helps those which are slipping through the cracks (or actively abandoned) by UK charities.

What advice would you give to a student who has to complete an internship remotely? Do you have any hints or tips on how to make the most of a remote internship?

The key to remote working is like anything: practice. Everything is hard until you’re used to it, and it will get easier with time. And in a couple of years everyone will be experts!

But, also, to make the most of your internship:

  • Keep closely in contact with your internship provider/colleagues, make sure you talk to them at least once a week by email and once every couple of weeks by phone/video call.
  • Remote internships often mean more freedom. Use this to explore the projects you enjoy, and hone your skills at them.
  • Don’t stress too much about it. They know you’re a student; they were expecting to hire a student. They won’t have through the roof expectations, and they won’t expect you not to have other commitments.

Applications for Professional Pathways 2021 close this week.You can find further details on how to apply here. The training programme will be delivered entirely online in June 2021 and we currently anticipate the internships will also be remote-working. 

Your Career in Journalism

Becca McAuley Graduated from the University of Exeter BA International Relations, 2018. She’s currently Sub-editor at the Daily Mail.  

Becca McAuley, University of Exeter Graduate and current Sub-editor at the Daily Mail

After I graduated from Exeter I did a MA in Newspaper Journalism at City, University of London. While I was there I did some work experiences at places like The Times, The Telegraph and PA where I learnt more about the different types of journalism which helped me to decide what sort of career I wanted. I applied successfully for the Trainee Sub-Editor Scheme at the Daily Mail and did a placement at Metro as part of my training before starting properly at the Mail.

“There’s a great satisfaction in writing a good headline or caption, and it’s even better when the story you’ve subbed is picked up on the TV or radio when the papers are being reviewed.”

Before doing my MA I didn’t really know what sub-editing was or even that it existed as a job in its own right, but it’s exactly what I’ve always enjoyed most about journalism. I absolutely love being on the front line of getting the paper out each day – the sub-editors are some of the last journalists who read the stories that go into the paper before it is printed. I love the variety of stories I get to read and edit and it’s so cool seeing the paper coming together over a couple of hours. There’s also a great satisfaction in writing a good headline or caption, and it’s even better when the story you’ve subbed is picked up on the TV or radio when the papers are being reviewed. On a typical day I come into the office in the afternoon and read that day’s paper so I know the context if there are any follow-ups to come. In any one shift I could go from subbing a story on Prince Harry to one about a big row at the heart of government – the variation keeps it interesting. Once all the stories have been subbed and the paper has been checked and printed we go again for the second and third edition, when updates to stories and new stories are added.

“In my third year I was co-editor of The Witness, the University’s politics journal, which is where I started to realise my love of sub-editing – before I even realised that was what it was. I was also a member of Xpression, the radio station, which I made news reports for and where I contributed to the Friday evening news hour.”

My favourite thing about my BA at Exeter was the variety of modules I could choose from, which meant I could make my degree exactly what I wanted it to be. I’ve always been really interested in the Middle East so I took advantage of being able to study modules from outside my discipline and took modules from the Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies – Jonathan Githens-Mazer’s modules on Muslims in Britain and Nationalisms in the Middle East were definitely some of my favourites and the fact these were often smaller classes was hugely beneficial in allowing the class to discuss and debate the topics and learn from each other. The modules offered by the Strategy and Security Institute were brilliant too and it was amazing to be taught by experts from the field – people with experience at the top levels of decision-making including Dr David Blagden and Dr Sergio Catignani. I also really enjoyed studying Contemporary Public Debate in an Age of Anti-Politics, which definitely gave me food for thought at a time I was figuring out how to become a journalist and what sort of journalist I wanted to be.  In my third year I was co-editor of The Witness, the University’s politics journal, which is where I started to realise my love of sub-editing – before I even realised that was what it was. I was also a member of Xpression, the radio station, which I made news reports for and where I contributed to the Friday evening news hour.

“For anyone wanting to get into journalism generally, the best thing you can do is get experience and make this experience varied. Write for the student paper or the magazines, have a blog, get work experience at local and national publications.”

My experience in student journalism at Exeter was invaluable – it gave me the skills I needed to be able to do a Masters while also convincing me that journalism was definitely the path I wanted to go down. The fact that my academic interests are also my journalistic interests meant everything I learnt in lectures taught me something that I could take with me in my career.

For anyone wanting to get into journalism generally, the best thing you can do is get experience and make this experience varied. Write for the student paper or the magazines, have a blog, get work experience at local and national publications. This will not only show your commitment but will help you to learn about different types of journalism and will give you an idea of what area you’d like to go into. For sub-editing the best advice I can give is read widely – this will help you to understand the different styles different newspapers or magazines have. Also don’t close yourself off to any types of news – as a sub-editor you can go from subbing a story about Love Island one minute to one about a big policy announcement the next so having at least some knowledge of lots of areas is vital.

I absolutely love sub-editing and in the future I’d like to expand my skill set to include commissioning. I would also be interested in one day working for a publication that focuses more in-depth on politics and policy decisions. I wouldn’t rule out a return to writing about politics in some form, though I definitely want more experience as a sub-editor first and I’m excited to see what the next few years hold.

Alumni Profile: William Cafferky, Public Policy Consultant

William Cafferky graduated from Exeter in BA Politics 2015, and MA Conflict Security and Development 2016. He’s currently a Public Policy Consultant at Cordis Bright. 

William Cafferky, Exeter Alumn, and Public Policy Consultant at Cordis Bright

Since I left Exeter, I’ve worked across the public sector in a variety of consulting and research roles. I began looking at how technology is used by the Department of Work and Pensions to improve the experience of those on benefits. I now work for a researcher consultancy, working across the public sector, in particular criminal justice, adult social care, and community healthcare. I began as a researcher, working mostly with clients from local government, central government, and charities to understand more about the impact of the work they do.

I have since been promoted, and now project manage a number of evaluations across our sectors. Examples of recent areas of work have included improving support for people who experience a combination of homelessness and substance misuse; encouraging behavioural change among perpetrators domestic abuse; and the benefits of providing more integrated healthcare.

“When I graduated, I was keen to find a job which would allow me to explore a variety of topics and ideas in order to better understand where my interests lay professionally. Consulting offered me that variety.”

When I graduated, I was keen to find a job which would allow me to explore a variety of topics and ideas in order to better understand where my interests lay professionally. Consulting offered me that variety. My first consulting job out of University gave me a robust introduction to domestic public policy. Nevertheless, I was keen to find something which enabled me to explore some of the aspect of the Conflict Security and Development MA which I had enjoyed so much, namely conducting robust research, which was grounded in real world situations, centered on improving people’s quality of life.

Whilst my career is not as internationally focused as my studies were, those aforementioned core elements are still a huge part of why I enjoy what I do. I get to be heavily involved in understanding the latest trends and innovations in policy which are looking to resolve some of the biggest questions we face around the health and wellbeing of our population. In addition to this, the fact that I work on such a diverse range of projects keeps my work interesting and challenging. Through the projects I manage, I get to work with commissioners, policy makers, and key stakeholders in a variety of sectors, whilst also getting the chance to interview and consult with frontline staff, and the people accessing different services.

The research projects I did, especially during my Masters course gave me a real edge in my interviews. I also think taking advantage of the opportunities University presents, in terms of the breadth of experiences on offer, can really help you make more informed decisions when it comes to post-University life.

“If you’re looking for a career in research specifically, don’t underestimate the importance of your dissertation, and the research methods you use as padding out your experience. Finding out what you don’t like can be just as valuable as realizing what you do like when finding a job which works for you.”

If you’re looking for a career in research specifically, don’t underestimate the importance of your dissertation, and the research methods you use as padding out your experience. If, like me, you’re not certain what you want to do, don’t be afraid to try things, and don’t be scared if you don’t enjoy them. Finding out what you don’t like can be just as valuable as realizing what you do like when finding a job which works for you.

I think the most important thing to remember is that you can’t expect yourself to know everything straight away, and you probably know more than you give yourself credit for! Be curious, ask questions, and feel comfortable getting things wrong, as long as you use it as an opportunity to learn.

For now I’m enjoying my time working across such a broad range of public policy sectors. I imagine that as time goes by, I might look to specialise more in an area I’m particularly interested by, for example working with homeless people. This might involve working more at a local council level, or within the civil service. I’ve also recently begun training to become a qualified football coach, so this might present opportunities in the future to balance these two career paths.

Working in Berlin

Phoebe Chubb is a current BSc Politics and International Relations with EEA at the University of Exeter.

Phoebe Chubb, current BSc Politics and International Relations with EEA at the University of Exeter, in Berlin.

(This blog post was written before the COVID-19 pandemic.) 

In my second year at University, I went to the autumn term Year Abroad meeting for students studying Social Science. I had always considered doing a study abroad year but wasn’t sure I wanted to be saddled with more debt by signing up to another year of studying. An opportunity arose when I was told about a more financially viable alternative the University offered: working abroad.

One year later, I am working for a start-up in the vibrant capital city of Germany, Berlin. I have been here for three months; I have sampled the food, moved flats three times, joined a netball club and met a number of interesting people from all around the world. To alleviate some of the qualms you may have about undertaking a year abroad, I thought I would share my initial reflections of this unique and wonderful experience the University supports.

“On reflection, the challenges I have faced have moulded me into a more resilient individual who is better prepared to deal with complications that arise, complications, which I have no doubt I will inevitably face in my later working life.”

I managed to procure a digital marketing internship for nine months with Labforward, a company that sells software solutions for scientists: an Electronic Lab Notebook (ELN) and a Lab Execution System. Now, if you had asked me prior to this internship what both of these were I would not have had a clue. I didn’t study science at A Level, and I do a Politics and International Relations (BSc) degree at University, so I wouldn’t say that I am well-versed in laboratory software. Yet, as a digital marketer, I have found that a large amount of my time is devoted to writing about new technological advancements which revolutionise the way we work, disruptive technologies like Artificial Intelligence, Automation and Internet of Things, a job which I thoroughly enjoy. This in itself demonstrates the breadth of internship opportunities that are available with this scheme, don’t limit yourself to one sector, try new things, and make the most of the opportunities working abroad facilitates.

“In this role, I have been encouraged to try new things and develop my skills further, and as a result, I have progressed as an individual both in skillset and in character.”

Unfortunately, my move to Berlin has not been without complications. When I first arrived I had a housing issue as the room I had booked was not as pictured. As a result, I had to move rooms three times and deal with frustrating admin tasks to try and solve the problems which I had no control over. Whilst this initially made me miss the simplicity of University life, on reflection, the challenges I have faced have moulded me into a more resilient individual who is better prepared to deal with complications that arise, complications, which I have no doubt I will inevitably face in my later working life.

I realise that I have been incredibly lucky with my internship. In the workplace, I am surrounded by a driven, talented team of individuals who have alleviated all my prior concerns about working abroad. Working for Labforward has made me realise what type of company I want to work at in the future, after all, working for a company where you are content is incredibly important. In this role, I have been encouraged to try new things and develop my skills further, and as a result, I have progressed as an individual both in skillset and in character.

As for those who worry about being away from friends in the year abroad, it is a consideration, yet should not dissuade you from going abroad. Whilst I miss my friends from university a lot, I’ve found that many people in my year have chosen to do a year abroad, choosing either to study or work. I have a friend who is currently somewhere in Japan, one who is in Brussels and another is in Spain. Plus if you make the effort you get to know people where you’re working, since being in Berlin I have joined a friendly netball club which has allowed me to meet people from all over the world.

“This internship hasn’t just helped me transfer academic skills into the working environment, it has been a journey which has gifted me a number of experiences one can only receive by living and working in a different country.”

My work abroad year has invigorated me with a drive to look into new areas of politics that I had not considered before. Writing about technological advancements has made me question what political and social impacts digitalisation will incur, a subject area I am keen to write my dissertation on. Already I have gained valuable experience that I can use to bolster my CV to acquire post-graduation employment. This internship hasn’t just helped me transfer academic skills into the working environment, it has been a journey which has gifted me a number of experiences one can only receive by living and working in a different country.