Exeter MSc Students Sharing Marine Science Widely

Prof Brendan Godley  teaches a MSc module on Marine Biodiversity and Conservation at the Centre for Ecology and Conservation on the University’s Penryn Campus. The students learn about a wide diversity of topics and undertake independent study on two major topics within their specific interests. These are assessed by a dissertation and an oral presentation to their peers, respectively. This year, the tutor challenged his students to go a stage further and produce an infographic to communicate the message of their oral presentation to a wide audience that could then be shared on Twitter or other social media platforms. Brendan wrote;

Communicating science, especially conservation science, to a wide audience is a key skill we all need to work on. This was my initial reasoning for setting the task. I think. however, that the exercise really challenged the students to distil and clarify their key take-home messages in advance of giving their talks. They achieved both of these aims with some aplomb and were widely complimented on their work.”

 

The module sees a range of invited marine conservation practitioners sharing their sectoral experience with the students. Katrina Ryan of Mindfully Wired a consultancy which specialises in science communication was one of the invited experts this year and gave the students feedback on their infographics as part of her session. Katrina added;

“It’s wonderful to see vital communication skills being fostered as part of these students’ wider conservation science learning. Condensing such complex subject matters into compelling graphics is a real challenge, but the students did a superb job and, as a result, many had significant impact on social media”

Tweet from Hetty Upton

Click her to see a storify of the tweets, starting with the single most impactful by Hetty Upton.

 

#ExeterMarine is a interdisciplinary group of marine related researchers with capabilities across the scientific, medical, engineering, humanities and social science fields. If you are interested in working with our researchers or students, contact Michael Hanley or visit our website!

 

Welcome to the #ExeterMarine Blog!

One of the great strengths at the University of Exeter is in our marine research and education.

The #ExeterMarine Initiative has been launched to help enhance collaborations within the University and to help highlight our interdisciplinary strength to outside partners. We will share information broadly in this blog, through social media channels (Twitter and Facebook) and on our dedicated website.

Research: It will surprise many, including some at the University of Exeter, how large the body of researchers working on marine subjects has become.  We now have over 200 academics and graduate students working directly on the major challenges facing human-kind that interface with the marine realm. We have significant groupings working on Climate Change and Renewable Energy, Fisheries and Aquaculture, Oceans and Human Health, Ecotoxicology and Pollution, and Marine Conservation. Our research in Exeter is ever more inter-disciplinary and our marine strength ranges from the humanities, through the life and social sciences to medicine and engineering.

This we undertake collaboratively with a wide range of influential partners including CEFAS, Met Office, Plymouth Marine Laboratory and Zoological Society of London.

Professor Brendan Godley #ExeterMarine Strategy Lead

 

Education: Our world-leading marine research underpins a wide range of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in Biosciences (including marine biology), Geography, Medicine, Psychology and Renewable Energy. We will seek to share our student voice and perspective through the #ExeterMarine Initiative. Watch this space!

Sharing:  We are proud of our record of sharing our findings and achievements with the wider community and we hope to augment this further still. See here for a listing of some of our most recent stories in the media. We hope that the blog may be a good introduction to the wealth of marine activities at the University of Exeter  for new students and collaborators. If you would like to discuss #ExeterMarine or, indeed,  contribute to the blog, please get in touch.

 

#ExeterMarine is a interdisciplinary group of marine related researchers with capabilities across the scientific, medical, engineering, humanities and social science fields. If you are interested in working with our researchers or students, please visit our website!

My #ExeterMarine PhD: Marine Turtles of Brazil

Author – Lili Colman (PhD Student) – Centre for Ecology and Conservation, Penryn Campus

From the moment I arrived at the University of Exeter to undertake my MSc in Conservation and Biodiversity, I quickly fell in love with the University, the Campus and Cornwall. Discovering all the cutting-edge research being carried out across the University of Exeter has been a definite highlight for me. The opportunity to participate in the Africa field course was one of the most amazing experiences of my life and one I will always cherish, having helped me build a practical understanding of large-scale conservation issues. My MSc research project centred on analysing 30 years of mark-and-recapture data from juvenile green turtles on an isolated tropical archipelago in Brazil, under the supervision of Prof Brendan GodleyThis published work contributes important insights regarding demographic parameters and population trends for this species.

Lili_Kenya
Meeting the Maasai in Kenya

 

Upon my return to Brazil, and whilst working as an environmental consultant there, I applied for a PhD at Exeter to work with TAMAR (the Brazilian Sea Turtle Conservation Programme). This on-going conservation project illustrates a powerful example of how marine turtles and coastal communities can co-exist in an ever-changing world. Despite a history of over-exploitation, the five different species of marine turtles that nest in Brazil are now fully protected by law. And as a result, recent years have shown very promising signs of population recovery. Perhaps most notably, a major part of this success can be attributed to the active involvement of the surrounding coastal communities in the conservation work. What once started in the direct employment of former egg poachers, now involves a wide range of activities to encourage environmental awareness in the area. This includes environmental campaigns, alongside the support of alternative, sustainable economic opportunities for the communities living near the nesting beaches.

Tamar

Local kids talking turtle in Bahia, Brazil (Banco de imagens Projeto TAMAR)

My PhD research focuses on the highly migratory leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea). This species has its major nesting site deep in the southwestern Atlantic ocean in eastern Brazil, on the northern coast of Espirito Santo. Projeto TAMAR has been monitoring the area since 1983 and there are promising signs of population recovery for the species. However, with a small population size and restricted geographical distribution, alongside the emergence of new threats – coastal development, fisheries bycatch, climate change, marine and light pollution – the population continues to be of conservation concern.

(Henrique Filgueiras)
Lili records leatherback sea turtle nesting (Henrique Filgueiras)

As part of the Marine Turtle Research Group (MTRG) at the University of Exeter, we are using a variety of techniques to investigate this population’s ecology, trends and the main impacts they are facing. This research is being done in collaboration with TAMAR in Brazil and Ciência Sem Fronteiras , a scholarship programme from the Brazilian Government. The knowledge obtained in this study will be used to design better and more effective conservation strategies for this species. I was delighted that my PhD project was chosen to feature in one of the films to celebrate TAMAR’s 35th anniversary:

#ExeterMarine is a interdisciplinary group of marine related researchers with capabilities across the scientific, medical, engineering, humanities and social science fields. If you are interested in working with our researchers or students, contact Michael Hanley or visit our website!