Summary of the 6th InsTED Workshop at the University of Nottingham

 

We would like to thank The School of Economics, University of Nottingham, for hosting and sponsoring the 6th InsTED Workshop.  We would also like to thank the Nottingham School of Economics for incorporating The World Economy Lecture into the InsTED Workshop, and Wiley for sponsoring this.… read more ...

Summary of the 5th InsTED Workshop at Syracuse University

We would like to thank The Department of Economics and the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University, for hosting and sponsoring the 5th InsTED Workshop.  We are also grateful for sponsorship and organizational support from the Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs, as well as sponsorship from the Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC) and the University of Exeter Business School.  The workshop took place at the Maxwell School from May 15th-16th 2018.  Special thanks go to Kristy Buzard and Devashish Mitra as joint chairs of the local organizing committee, and Juanita Horan for her extremely helpful interactions with everyone.… read more ...

Economics of Populism

Social scientists regard globalization and technological progress as major contributors to the ongoing increase in job and income polarization in the United States and Europe. This increased inequality is thought to have reduced standards of living for the median voter in both regions.  Against this backdrop, the 2007-2008 financial crisis seems to have created a political and economic climate of populism on both the right and the left of the political spectrum.… read more ...

Break-up of Nations

The Brexit vote on June 23rd 2016 highlights the basic fact that the costs and benefits of economic and political integration are unequally distributed across different social groups within a region.  Because integration has winners and losers, when decisions on sovereignty are taken through majority voting it is possible that a majority against integration emerges even if it is efficient to integrate.… read more ...

Do Ethnic Divisions Matter for Civil Conflict?

Over the second half of the 20th century, civil conflicts (i.e. intra-state conflict) have become increasingly dominant and now account for a greater share of deaths and hardship than any other form of conflict (the main comparator being inter-state conflict).  Empirical research shows that economic variables, particularly poverty and income inequality, are important determinants of civil conflict and there are a variety of channels through which they take effect.  For example, in poor countries young men choose to join the conflict because their expected income from fighting is greater than the income that they would obtain from the labor market, especially if natural resources are under dispute.… read more ...

Natural Resources and Political Stability

There is increasing interest in how natural resources influence political stability. Under a dictatorial regime, political stability is determined by the ability of a ruling group to stay in power. If political power is the route to personal riches by the appropriation of natural resource income, remaining in power is that much more attractive.… read more ...