Tag Archives: employer

Research Intern – CLES, University of Exeter

report

What were your main duties and responsibilities during the course of your internship?

I had to write up first-draft reports on British mammal species to be submitted into the review. Other tasks included creating questionnaires, emailing, communicating with other researchers and assisting with the collation of the results. I also worked on developing code in R to produce species-specific population estimates from large data-sets of mammal population densities in different habitats. In addition, I researched using ArcGIS to model species distribution, and to extract habitat data to go towards initial population estimates.

What would you say was your biggest achievement over the course of your internship?

I developed my skills in GIS and R, by a considerable degree. It was fantastic to potentially be the first person to know how many of a particular mammal existed in the UK! It was very rewarding to go through the process, from using GIS, carrying out meta-analyses, obtaining the estimate and finally writing up the species account. I learnt a great deal about the amazing mammalian wildlife we have here on our shores.

What benefits did your internship bring to your employer?

The Mammal Population Review is a huge undertaking, and I hope I hoped to considerably lower the workload needed to be done. I hope others felt I became a valued member of the team. I felt that I was, and had an incredibly enjoyable time working with the others in the lab.

“Luke made an excellent contribution to the team. I believe he also gained valuable skills that will help him get a job in the future” – Associate Professor.

Global Employability Assistant – University of Exeter

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What were your main duties and responsibilities during the course of your internship?

The main objective of my role was to provide administrative support to the Employment Services Teams in the Career Zone (Global & UK). My main responsibility was to upload  vacancies on to CareerHub, and so this required acquiring all the necessary information from the employers beforehand, and formatting vacancy advertisements so that they were accessible to students looking to apply. For this reason, I had to liaise with employers via email about the positions they were offering, and create an online vacancy based on the information provided. I also carried out some ad hoc work, such as flyering for our careers fairs and inputting data about our employer contacts.

What would you say was your biggest achievement over the course of your internship?

I have learnt a considerable amount about the application process for graduate schemes by being ‘behind the scenes’; uploading vacancies on a day-to-day basis has highlighted to me what it is that employers are looking for, and how to succeed in filling out tricky application forms. Also, I am a lot more familiar with Microsoft Office, for instance I dreaded using Excel before and avoided it at all costs, but now I have been shown how to use it correctly and efficiently, I will certainly be using it more in the workplace.

What benefits did your internship bring to your employer?

A lot of my work for the CareerZone required autonomy, especially because I was split between two departments (Global & UK Vacancies), so I would say that I helped my colleagues most by working efficiently and getting tasks done swiftly. One of the tasks I worked on was uploading a number of Studentships to CareerHub, and I composed a spread sheet to keep a log of what ones had been uploaded/deleted, which others can use as a reference. Also, I helped out the careers fairs by flyering around the university; I was therefore more than happy to carry out additional tasks besides my main responsibility of uploading vacancies.

Did you encounter any problems during the course of your internship and if so, how did you overcome them?

Sometimes in quieter periods there would be a shortage in vacancies, which, as a main part of my job role, meant I had little to do. I overcame this by asking around the office for ad hoc tasks and helped out wherever I could. It was never a major problem as someone always had a task for me to do.

“Paige has provided essential support during her time with me, and has been a pleasure to have in the office” – Line Manager

Film Research Support & Administration Intern – University of Exeter

film

What were your main duties and responsibilities during the course of your internship?

My duties included:

Updating programme descriptors and modules on iPaMS.
Researching and drafting a plan for the MA IFB webpage.
Collecting student information and formulating a questionnaire for a postgraduate film student database.
Helping with module change and allocation.
Assisting with archiving.
Some reception assistance.
Writing a summary report of film workshop feedback.
Helping with any other general ad hoc tasks.

What would you say was your biggest achievement over the course of your internship?

Helping the team out with iPaMS as I really felt like I made a positive impact which was appreciated. I also feel that my work for the MAIFB webpage and film workshop summary was of a good standard I was proud of.

What benefits did your internship bring to your employer?

I feel like I have helped relieve some of the pressures on the team at a busy time. I hope that my work for the PG database helps the film department and that my draft for the MAIFB webpage gets used and benefits the students.

“We have loved having our Intern Maxine, who had an extremely positive impact on the team and the work that we do” – Line Manager

Archives Assistant – Heritage Collections, University of Exeter

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What were your main duties and responsibilities during the course of your internship?

My role as a temporary archives assistant primarily involved cataloguing the correspondence of South West writer Henry Williamson. I was also given the opportunity to supervise the Special Collections Reading Room desk, and participate in key processes in Heritage Collections such as retrievals and re-shelving, selecting and preparing materials for display and working with Arts and Culture to help promote academic events. I was also given the opportunity to shadow other fundamental parts of working in a university archive, such as accessions, digitisation and answering queries, and was given access to wider reading about the sector and archival practices.

What would you say was your biggest achievement over the course of your internship?

My biggest achievement over the course of my internship has been the ability I have gained to try new things, and believe in my own skillset. The department trusted me with some of their most precious collections – including letters by Thomas Hardy and Agatha Christine – and being able to work on such important materials really helped me gain confidence in my own abilities, and the skills I can bring to future employers.

What benefits did your internship bring to your employer?

My help in cataloguing Henry Williamson’s correspondence meant that the Special Collections team could present a more detailed record of their collections to the public and researchers, making the materials in the archive more accessible. My proudest moment as part of my internship was when I was informed that the work I had undertaken had resulted in a request for that material – by contributing to the Special Collections catalogue, a process that also taught me about cataloguing software CALM, I had also made a tangible and positive impact on the service they are able to provide.

“Lucy was an extremely high calibre intern who managed much of the intern process herself. There were some hitches in the process and her proactive approach really helped with this” – Head of Heritage Collections

Planning and Research Intern – All We Can, Methodist Relief and Development

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What were your main duties and responsibilities during the course of your internship?

I had a variety of tasks to fulfil during my time as an intern at All We Can as I had various roles in the organisation. I was first tasked to review their travel policy for when staff members would go to meet partners in developing countries. This required extensive research on the transport to and from, as well as in, the respective countries. After this I worked on the organisation’s country profiling documents, assessing which countries would be viable for AWC to work in and find partners. Once again this required research on many aspects of the country such as its HDI, political environment, corruption levels and cultural backgrounds. The third task I was given was to create a flow chart describing the organisations guidance on scoping new countries for partners to work with. I helped at a supporters awareness meeting in the Midlands where I represented the organisation and assisted with answering questions from supporters and clearing down the room. I summarised and tabulated answers from the questionnaires filled in by the international partners regarding the advocacy and humanitarian work of AWC, as well as investigating what the salary scales for international NGO’s staff working in developing countries was.

What would you say was your biggest achievement over the course of your internship?

I received a first-hand eye witness experience of what it means to work in an international humanitarian aid organisation dealing with work directly related to humanitarian development with partners in developing countries. From this I have been able to gain a better understanding of what working in this industry entails, and all of the behind the scenes work that goes into making projects successful. The most rewarding of all was being exposed to a totally new, cutting-edge approach to humanitarian aid that I had not come across before in my studies whereby this small organisation is able to partner with communities and work not only with them, but for them.  The people receiving the funding are at the table with the donors setting the agenda for the aid work that will take place in the community. This was incredibly enlightening and eye-opening for me.

What benefits did your internship bring to your employer?

The work which I did for All We Can during my internship enabled them to accelerate their administration and planning programs regarding the new approach to partnerships in developing countries. This decreased and simplified the workload for several of the staff and provided support when several of the staff were away on international trips visiting partners. I also ensured the smooth running of the supporters awareness day.

Did you encounter any problems during the course of your internship and if so, how did you overcome them?

There were some occasions when I struggled to understand how to formulate certain information and I was able to ask for advice and support to complete the work effectively. I was unable to access the printer from my computer therefore I emailed the work to a colleague and they were able complete this for me.

“Joel  carried out research, providing global poverty and development statistics that fed into our country scoping strategy. He also analysed survey questionnaires on our humanitarian assistance and advocacy programmes and provided a summarised and condensed version of the results, spelling out trends and patterns. He also supported one of our volunteer training sessions.” – Head of Programme Operations.