Kate’s Grand Tour, Part 2 of 4: Arriving in Laakdal, Belgium

Professor Catherine (Kate) Leyshon, our Principal Investigator, was able to travel for the first time since our project launch in early 2020. She referred to her trip as the “Grand Tour”! We asked her to write about her journey to East Sussex and subsequent visit to Laakdal in Belgium, and give us a writerly flavour of what those places look and feel like, since we’ve been unable to visit. Here’s part two: her first glimpse of Laakdal. More to follow!

I arrive on the Eurostar in Brussels and pick up a hire car for the drive to Diest, the town where I am staying about 25 minutes away from the municipality of Laakdal, in the province of Antwerp. The municipality comprises the towns of Eindhout, Veerle, Vorst, Varendonk and Vorst-Meerlaar, all of which are involved with HAIRE. Diest is a pretty, well-kept town with narrow cobbled streets and new buildings tastefully blended into its historic town-centre. I take a walk up through a leafy park and back through the town square, lined with canopied restaurants where diners are enjoying the warm spring evening.

The next day, I drive to Vorst in Laakdal. Initially my car’s sat nav wants to take me to Vorst near Brussels but I realise this is in completely the wrong direction! I drive out of Diest and I’m quickly into the flat, farmed landscape of this part of Belgium. The road is straight and quiet. As I reach Vorst, I notice how quiet and tidy it is. We are meeting in the fantastic Gemeentehuis. Recently constructed and serving the whole municipality, it contains the library, a post office, meeting rooms, the only bank machine in town and some local council functions.

I meet four volunteers who have some fascinating insights into their experience of using the HAIRE toolkit. They are very generous with their knowledge, and – with a retired Alderman amongst their number – we have an in-depth discussion about new models of service design and delivery. The issues in this part of rural Belgium are familiar across the project: people growing older sometimes become less confident and stop going out as much. They become isolated and suffer some consequences to their overall wellbeing. The Guided Conversation has helped to reconnect them to the community. The partners are especially looking forward to taking ownership of a new minibus; transport here is very limited – it’s no surprise that getting around is a problem in all our pilot sites.

New Perspectives on Geography and Loneliness: Introduction

Jo Little, Shuks Esmene, Catherine Leyshon and Michael Leyshon, researchers at the University of Exeter, have been working on a new paper about loneliness which we introduce below. It’s one of the key issues for the rural ageing population in our study, and it’s particularly on our minds as we post, as it was recently Mental Health Awareness Week in the UK, and loneliness was the theme. For some practical tips on coping with loneliness in later life, the Mental Health Foundation has created a toolkit which you can access here.

Over recent years there has been growing recognition from government, policy makers, academics and the public of the significance of loneliness within contemporary society and with the associated deep and enduring negative consequences for wellbeing and quality of life. For example, a recent study characterises loneliness’s societal impact as follows: “Social isolation and loneliness has been classed as a major public health concern due to its negative physical and mental health implications, and living in a remote or rural area is a prominent contributing risk factor”. Loneliness has been referred to by the UK Minister for Loneliness as one of the greatest challenges of our time.

While the visibility of loneliness has increased substantially, and more understanding exists concerning its links to health, there are still important gaps in current research which we will explain and develop in our paper. We aim to develop critical scholarly understandings of loneliness that go beyond measurable indicators and risk factors (such as living in rural settings and mobility issues). While such indicators and risk factors are important in producing an overview of loneliness’s causes and impacts, loneliness is increasingly seen as not simply an individual problem and an issue that manifests due to a combination of risk factors, but as more inherently social, cultural and relational. As Geographers we are mindful of the difference that space and place make in both conceptual understandings of loneliness and its manifestation as a lived experience.

As we write, we begin with a review of the study of loneliness, summarizing some of the findings of what have been perhaps more traditional attempts to identify and measure experiences of loneliness. This provides an understanding of key trends but acts more as a springboard for the next part of the paper in which we, first, provide an improved conceptual understanding of loneliness as a dynamic part of the human condition, the definition of which derives from a set of cultural expectations as much as a lived experience which is embodied and performed in everyday life. We ask what is the connection between the apparent ‘epidemic’ of loneliness and the human condition in a world characterised by endless connection?

Second, and in a linked point, we call for more work on the multiple, shifting ways in which loneliness forms part of the lived experience. Much research implies a somewhat uncritical view of loneliness as a binary condition of being or not being lonely. This has implications for the sorts of solutions that are provided by governments, charities, communities, and individuals, which sometimes tackle ‘aloneness’ rather than ‘loneliness’. Loneliness has temporal and spatial dimensions, it comes and goes, can be experienced in a crowded place or when alone, has causes that are both identifiable and elusive, is linked to a sense of self and the place of the self in the community and wider society. Ultimately, loneliness should be understood as a profoundly subjective experience. Building on and developing Franklin’s 2009 paper, ‘On Loneliness’, we provide a critical examination of the key ‘taken for granted’ characteristics of loneliness. This will explore how loneliness is felt and experienced in contemporary society – and in particular how it relates to social bonds.

Our paper argues that a focus on space is a critical part of the complex jigsaw of loneliness – not simply that loneliness occurs more in some places than others – rather, that place can be central to the ways in which loneliness ‘sticks’ to identity. To explore these issues, we take as our focus rural spaces and the particular relationship between the constructions and contradictions of rurality and loneliness as part of its lived reality.

Kate’s Grand Tour Part One: A Visit to Rother

Professor Catherine Leyshon, our Principal Investigator, was able to travel for the first time since our project launch in early 2020. She referred to her trip as the “Grand Tour”! We asked her to write about her journey to East Sussex and subsequent visit to Laakdal in Belgium, and give us a writerly flavour of what those places look and feel like, since we’ve been unable to visit. Here’s part one, starting in Rye, East Sussex. More posts to follow!

I arrive at Rye station in afternoon spring sunshine opposite Jempsons, which looks to be a well-stocked grocery store/deli with attractive displays. It’s a short walk to the Ship Inn through the historic redbrick town centre. It’s rush-hour in Rye, with children eagerly getting on the train home from school. The offices of the Bluebird care agency remind me that Rye has an aging population, many of whom suffer from isolation and loneliness. This is why Rye is part of HAIRE, along with the nearby town of Robertsbridge, both in the county of East Sussex.

I turn off the delightfully named Wish Street onto Wish Ward in the direction of a disused factory, a piece of industrial heritage referencing the area’s past. A former bakery, it now houses a pottery. I walk past picturesque redbrick and half shingle houses. The pretty townhouse along a cobbled street with a new Jaguar parked outside tells a story that I’m only too familiar with from Cornwall where the picturesque rural setting can hide great disparities in wealth. Mermaid Street, with its ancient, rounded cobbles, opens up to my left. The Ship Inn – my destination after 7 hours traveling from Cornwall, sits in an attractive riverside location. After dumping my bags, I go for a run along a levee between the river and a nature reserve. It’s a lovely part of the world – startlingly flat compared to Cornwall.

The next day, I meet four volunteers from HAIRE and the team from East Sussex County Council, Rother Voluntary Action, and Lorna Ford, the new Deptuty CEO from Rother District Council. We all feel thrilled to be able to meet up after two years on Teams. In that time, 16 volunteers have been recruited and trained, 76 Guided Conversations have been held and more than 200 hours of information about health and wellbeing have been used in the research analysis. Key themes prioritised through the innovation process are loneliness, accessing information, life transitions, and staying active.

We have a great meeting, discussing the volunteer experience of using the HAIRE toolkit – especially the Guided Conversation – and the legacy of HAIRE which will be felt through the pilot projects in Age Friendly Rother, now officially a part of the World Health Organisation’s Age Friendly Community programme.

The eight domains of Age Friendly Communities are illustrated. They are: Communication and Information, Community and Healthcare, Transportation, Housing, Civic Participation and Employment, Outdoor Spaces and Buildings, and Respect and Social Inclusion. 

Above: the eight domains are Communication and Information, Community and Healthcare, Transportation, Housing, Civic Participation and Employment, Outdoor Spaces and Buildings, and Respect and Social Inclusion. 

 

 

The Latest News from Poperinge

The following article, translated from the Dutch, appeared in the local publication, Stadskrant (“the City Newspaper”), in Poperinge, Belgium in February, 2022, informing local citizens of the work undertaken so far by Poperinge’s HAIRE team.

Poperinge is a partner in the HAIRE project, which stands for Healthy Ageing through Innovation in Rural Europe. The project aims to improve the wellbeing of seniors in Poperinge and its sub-municipalities, and to break through isolation and loneliness in the countryside. Numerous volunteers and professionals in healthcare have been involved in the project.

75 people over sixty were interviewed in Poperinge and smaller surrounding areas. The interviews mapped out the wellbeing of each participant, and allowed the drawing up of an individual action plan. The interviews are also part of a developing ‘community report’, with suggestions for all kinds of areas for improvement for the neighbourhood. Wellbeing is a word that is important in everyone’s life and at every age; meaningful and fun activities for the elderly help create a positive community atmosphere.

Four volunteers from Nestor services, the Local Service Center De Bres, WZC Huize Proventier and the Social Service went out with an extensive questionnaire asking about general well-being, what seniors think of their neighbourhood, what activities can be organized to help them age better and how everyone can benefit from this. A number of questions about the individual’s social network were also discussed.

The interviews lasted one and a half to two hours. The interviewee could choose from telephone or face to face sessions in person to complete the survey. Of course, all safety measures regarding coronavirus were observed during personal visits. Participation was entirely without obligation and participants were able to choose between a thank you gift voucher of 20 euros or two free meals delivered to the home by WZC Huize Proventier.

“Although I was armed with a mouth mask, safety screen and hand sanitiser, I was warmly welcomed everywhere by the fifteen interviewees despite Covid,” says Luc, who is 68 years old and volunteers at Local Services Center De Bres and WZC Huize Proventier. “Many older people found it a pity that services such as banks, post offices and shops are disappearing from their local areas. It’s vital for them that the city invests in basic services like neighbourhood salons or shops, which then become the beating heart of the village.”

MEANINGFUL ACTIVITIES

The person-centred topics in the survey addressed the emotional well-being of the seniors. It emerged that they need a listening ear for emotional problems and for things that are not going well in the specific care of older people. An effort is needed to enable more people to grow old with good mental health and well-being. Luc clarifies: “Participation in meaningful activities such as volunteering, culture promotion, computer education and in some cases staying longer at work are here clearly reflected in the answers.” Concerns about caring for later, dementia and early care planning were also discussed. Many seniors want to age actively. “Local cooperation is of great importance. It is important to gain insight into loneliness in all its aspects. Everything starts with making contacts. As a result, all of a senior citizens’ associations, including community workers, the police and the postman, are of great importance,” said Luc.

TO STAY INFORMED

Regular contacts with neighbours, friends, family and caregivers are crucial. Luc concludes: “On average, we noticed an increase in the number of relatives in the social network of seniors, but at the same time a decrease in the number of non-relatives. As you get older, your world becomes smaller. People around you die or become less mobile, so that they disappear from your social network. It is important that the seniors are provided with resources so they can stay informed and be involved in the world around them.”

You can read the article in its original language below:

Crossborder Recipes: The HAIRE Christmas Party 2021

Season’s Greetings! After nearly two years of working together throughout the Covid pandemic, the team has still not managed to meet up in person since the project launch in early 2020. At the end of 2021, plans for our first face to face gathering were once again thwarted by the emergence of Omicron, but we are still finding ways to connect with each other on a personal level despite everything. To celebrate the season, the HAIRE team got together virtually to share their favourite family recipes from each of our four countries: the UK, France, Belgium and the Netherlands. Such was the response we decided to make our own HAIRE recipe book, featuring tasty dips and snacks, desserts and treats from across the 2Seas region. Below are a few highlights …bon appetit!

Kaat’s Appelbol (The Netherlands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HAIRE is about “a good old age”: project progress in Laakdal

Thanks to our colleagues in Laakdal for sending us a news article which was published after a large stakeholder event discussing the co-creation and prioritisation of local social innovations. Below is a translation into English of the article by Annelies Frederickx published on Wednesday 20th October, 2021. You can read the original article at source here.

The seniors of Laakdal debate four themes: mobility, leisure, caring for tomorrow and communication — © AF

Laakdal is the first municipality to undertake the European participation project HAIRE.

HAIRE’s pilot site in Laakdal involves a partnership between the local government and Welzijnszorg Kempen, an organisation specialising in the health and wellbeing of the most vulnerable in society, including older people. In Laakdal, 28% of the population is senior, so the municipality is ideally suited to explore the possibilities of co-creation with older people. There is also interest from adjacent areas, Mol and Herselt, in working with HAIRE.

Katrien Serroyen of Welzijnszone Kempen takes an active part in the debate. — © AF

The first part of the started in September 2020 with a neighbourhood analysis (a mapping of resources with residents in the neighbourhood; see this earlier blog post for an overview of what this entailed in Feock, UK, one of our other pilot sites.) Volunteers were then recruited to carry out “Guided Conversations.” Sixteen volunteers set out from the community to interview 71 older people. The respondents were 60, 70, 80 and 90 years old and they lived all over Laakdal. The Guided Conversations contain place- and person-related questions, as well as a section on personal empowerment. The results yielded a long list of more than a hundred action points. In consultation with the municipal council, the project team has filtered four priorities from this: mobility, leisure, care for tomorrow (dementia and early care planning) and communication. The older people surveyed all expressed the wish to rename the HAIRE project ‘A good old age in Laakdal’, as the English acronym did not resonate as strongly.

Sofie Schepers is an expert community-oriented care provider in Laakdal. — © AF

During the kick-off in the local meeting centre, some thirty people over sixty set to work on the four priority themes. In each domain, they identified the most important difficulties and looked for possible solutions. Rosa Wilms took an active part in the debate as she has been involved from the start: “When I read the call in the municipal information sheet, I immediately applied to be a volunteer”, Rosa Wilms reveals. “I was alone and this seemed to be an ideal pastime for me. I like to chat and through the project I was also able to make new contacts. I had a total of ten conversations, four online and six at home. They were all intense but wonderful conversations.”

Rosa Wilms has been involved in every phase of the project. — © AF

“My chats showed that older people in Laakdal struggle with a lack of respect from neighbours, young people and from traffic”, Rosa Wilms adds. “Of course there’s not much a municipal council can do about that; we all have to work on that together. I completely agree with the four chosen themes. Choices must of course be made and it seems realistic to me that the municipal council can achieve things in those four domains. The most important thing for me, however, is that we are being listened to.”

Difficult points to resolve or improve were noted for each theme. — © AF

Sofie Schepers, who leads the project for the municipal government, had good news for the participants. “The municipality is buying a van and it will be available to all older people in Laakdal. It can be used to provide transport to activities in all boroughs and we are also looking at the possibility of, for example, providing transport to the local market. The aim to provide ‘A good old age in Laakdal’ has only just started, but we are well on our way.”

L’impact du projet HAIRE : un portrait de notre site pilote à Feock (Translation)

Below is the French translation of an earlier blog post in English detailing the progress of HAIRE in the parish of Feock, one of our UK pilot sites. Thanks as always to our University of Exeter intern, Valentine Naude.

Cathy Whitmore, responsable administrative dans la paroisse civile de Feock au Royaume-Uni, est une interlocutrice fondamentale pour les différents membres de sa communauté. Durant cette dernière année, elle a passé le plus clair de son temps à répondre aux appels téléphoniques et à mettre en place des mesures d’assistance pour les membres de sa communauté – tout au long des divers confinements ainsi qu’au terme de ceux-ci. Elle a également rassemblé les points de vue de tous les intervenants qui jouent un rôle dans le perfectionnement et le développement de produits et de services visant à améliorer la vie des personnes âgées – et avant tout, les points de vue des personnes âgées elles-mêmes. Le projet HAIRE a donné l’opportunité aux résidents de parler de sujets qui leur tiennent à cœur.

Pendant cette période difficile, le projet a donné de la motivation, de l’énergie, et de l’assurance à tous ceux qui ont fait du bénévolat et travaillé au sein de la communauté, y compris les commerces, les écoles et les groupes religieux. L’esprit communautaire a été mis à rude épreuve tout au long de la pandémie ; dans un précédent article qui traitait de la bonté des bénévoles au plus fort de la crise COVID, nous remarquions que 150 bénévoles se sont portés volontaires pour venir en aide aux autres villageois. Pour cette raison, Feock n’a pas eu la moindre difficulté à recruter des « Aidants HAIRE » – il s’agit des bénévoles qui viennent à la rencontre des personne âgées pour mieux comprendre leurs attentes et leurs besoins. Il y a même eu un surplus de 50% en matière d’Aidants HAIRE recrutés dans la paroisse civile, ce qui a surpassé toutes les attentes.

Une interview récente, réalisée à Feock avec la bénévole Sue Thomas, est parue durant l’évènement en ligne « Virtual Voyage », créé par Interreg 2 Mers – qui finance notre projet – à l’occasion de la Journée de la Coopération Européenne le 21 septembre 2021. Sue a rejoint le projet dans l’intention de venir en aide à la communauté locale. Dans le cadre du processus de préparation des Aidants HAIRE, elle a suivi des séances de formation visant à inculquer aux bénévoles des compétences d’écoute, d’interview, de protection et d’autres encore, qui pourraient bénéficier non seulement aux individus, mais aussi à l’ensemble de la communauté. Alors qu’Interreg mettait en valeur le travail de tous ceux qui se trouvent sur le terrain à travers la zone européenne des 2 Mers, nous avons eu un aperçu des résultats obtenus par les bénévoles de Feock. Vous pouvez accéder à l’interview de Sue sur YouTube ici.

Selon Cathy, le projet a créé un point de ralliement pour les personnalités notables de la communauté – celles qui tissent des liens sociaux et celles qui les influencent. Il s’agit de personnes qui faisaient déjà du bénévolat, en proposant et en dirigeant des activités de groupe, et les membres des conseils, par exemple – toutes des personnes qui ont un intérêt direct dans l’amélioration de la vie de nos séniors. Travailler ensemble sur le thème central du bien vieillir permettra à terme d’ouvrir la voie à des solutions plus solides et interconnectées. La paroisse civile de Feock est constituée de plusieurs communautés, et le projet HAIRE leur a permis de se considérer comme une seule famille de villages réunis dans la paroisse civile de Feock, avec des problèmes et des préoccupations similaires, plutôt que des entités indépendantes sur une échelle d’importance et de statut, afin que plus de personnes puissent bénéficier des initiatives locales.

Le projet HAIRE a inspiré ses nouveaux participants et les a incités à présenter leurs idées et proposer leur aide. Un projet intergénérationnel a été lancé par un artiste local qui a découvert le projet HAIRE en discutant avec l’équipe, et ils sont maintenant en train de planifier un « Festival Memory Shanty ». Les séniors de la communauté feront le récit de leur vie et partageront leur point de vue unique avec des écoliers, qui travailleront avec des musiciens pour composer des chansons de marin basées sur les vies réelles de leur communauté. De manière générale, le projet HAIRE a donné l’opportunité aux gens de faire preuve de créativité et d’originalité – il n’y a « pas de mauvaise idée ». Il y a quelque chose de très puissant à voir les idées des uns et des autres se transformer en action positive.

Les conversations avec les participants ont amélioré notre compréhension des changements qui jalonnent le cours d’une vie, et de leur impact à un niveau multigénérationnel. Le vieillissement nous impacte tous, pas seulement les « personnes âgées ». Le danger d’un monde qui se rétrécit au fur et à mesure que l’on vieillit, nous exposant à la solitude, est largement reconnu. Sachant cela, les individus peuvent commencer plus tôt à planifier leur avenir, avec la participation d’organismes d’assistance.

Tous les sites pilotes visent à améliorer les services qui sont déjà en place et qui jouent un rôle important, ainsi qu’à établir un lien avec eux. A Feock, l’importance et la disponibilité croissantes de la prescription sociale permet aux résidents d’être dirigés vers des activités locales pour une multitude de raisons différentes, par exemple la perte d’un être cher, l’anxiété ou la solitude. Les bénévoles du projet HAIRE sont disponibles pour se mettre en binôme avec des membres de la communauté en fonction de leurs intérêts – par exemple la natation, le jardinage ou la promenade. Les bénévoles les accompagnent en leur tenant la main (métaphoriquement) pour les aider à découvrir ou redécouvrir certaines activités sociales, et ainsi développer confiance et relations. L’équipe a développé une liste « Que se passe-t-il ? » et un « Répertoire des groupes, services, et assistances téléphoniques » pouvant être envoyés aux résidents, qui sont plus tard contactés par téléphone et se voient offrir la possibilité de conseils supplémentaires et d’assistance s’ils en ont besoin à l’avenir. Toutes les activités organisées dans la paroisse civile sont annoncées et révisées de façon régulière dans un format accessible et inclusif.

Les ateliers CREATE qui ont eu lieu pendant la période estivale ont rassemblé tous ces individus dans un espace de tolérance pour qu’ils puissent partager leurs idées, exprimer leurs opinions, et se sentir écoutés et respectés. Le projet HAIRE a pu répondre aux remarques et à la demande en solutions rapides qui pourraient être développées sur le long terme. Il faut noter que le travail de vérification autour de la pertinence des services existants et le travail de création de nouveaux services ne s’arrêteront pas quand l’étude touchera à sa fin. Les communautés impliquées sont en train de développer un type de compétences et d’opportunités qui peuvent réellement changer les choses, et qui pourront évoluer avec leur temps jusqu’à garantir une culture d’écoute et d’apprentissage aussi naturelle que florissante, qui engendrera une action positive et adaptée aux personnes âgées.

Le projet HAIRE fait appel à ses intervenants à intervalles réguliers et de façon différente tout au long du projet, tandis que nous continuons de promouvoir un changement global et durable du système ainsi que d’amorcer et de développer des modèles innovatifs de prestation des services. Dans cette perspective, nous organisons régulièrement des réunions de groupe pour établir une ligne directrice, par exemple la « HAIRE Action Group Meeting » de la paroisse civile de Feock, qui a eu lieu en Septembre 2021.

The impact of HAIRE: A profile from our Cornish pilot site in Feock, UK

Cathy Whitmore, HAIRE’s administrative officer in the Parish of Feock, UK, is a key point of contact for community members. Over the last year, Cathy has spent her time fielding phone calls and organising support for community members throughout the various lockdowns and beyond, and collating points of view from all stakeholders invested in the improvement and development of products and services that aspire to support and enhance the lives of older people – most importantly from older people themselves. HAIRE has offered residents an opportunity to speak up on matters close to their hearts.

The project has provided a sense of purpose, energy, and confidence during a difficult period for those volunteering or working in the community, including businesses, schools and faith groups. The spirit of community has been tested throughout the pandemic; in a previous post discussing the kindness of volunteers at the peak of the covid crisis, 150 volunteers come forward to help their fellow villagers. Because of that, Feock had no difficulties recruiting “HAIRE Enablers” – these are the volunteers who meet with older people to understand their needs and service desires. In fact, there was a 50% over-recruitment of volunteer HAIRE Enablers in the parish, which exceeded all expectations.

A recent interview with volunteer Sue Thomas in Feock featured in our project funder Interreg 2 Seas‘ “Virtual Voyage” online event, which was created for European Cooperation Day on September 21, 2021. Sue joined the project in order to help and support her local community. As part of the HAIRE volunteer preparation process, Sue took part in training sessions designed to provide skills in listening, interviewing, safeguarding and other skills that not only benefit the individual, but the community as a whole. With Interreg showcasing the work of people on the ground all over the 2 Seas area in Europe, we were given a glimpse into Feock volunteers’ achievements. Sue’s interview can be accessed on YouTube here.

Cathy said the project has created a rallying point for key figures in the community – social weavers and influencers. These are people already involved in volunteering, offering and running group activities, and council members, for example – all people who have a vested interested in making the lives of our older people better. To work together on the central theme of healthy ageing will ultimately enable stronger and more linked up solutions. Feock Parish is made up of several communities, and HAIRE has enabled them to envisage themselves as a family of villages within Feock Parish, with similar issues and concerns, rather than separate entities on a scale of importance and status, so that more people can benefit from local initiatives.

HAIRE has given inspiration and motivated fresh personnel to come forward with ideas and offers of support. An intergenerational project has been initiated by a local artist who discovered HAIRE through conversations with the team and they are now putting together plans for a “Memory Shanty Festival.” Older people in the community will share their life stories and unique points of view with schoolchildren, who will work with musicians to produce sea shanties based on real lives in their community. In general, HAIRE has provided people with an opportunity to be creative and innovative – there is “no such thing as a wrong idea”. There is something very powerful in seeing one’s ideas turn into positive action.

The conversations with participants have provided a better understanding of life changes and their impact on a multi-generational level. Ageing impacts us all, not just “older adults”. There is widespread recognition of the danger of a shrinking life world as we age, which puts us at risk of loneliness. Knowing this, it means individuals can start to plan for the future earlier, with the involvement of supporting organisations.

All pilot sites aim to improve the services already in place that have value and link in to them. In Feock, social prescribing’s growing importance and availability means that residents can be signposted to local activities for a range of different reasons, including bereavement, anxiety or loneliness. HAIRE’s volunteers are available “buddy up” with community members depending on their interest – such as swimming, gardening or walking.

The volunteers provide a guiding ‘hand-hold’ to help people discover or return to social activities, developing trust and relationships. The team has created a ‘What’s On’ list and ‘Directory of Groups, Service, and Helplines’ which can be sent to residents, who are later contacted by telephone and given the offer for further advice and support if required in the future. All the activities in the parish are advertised and reviewed on a regular basis in an accessible and inclusive format. They even advertise opportunities in a community phone box.

The CREATE workshops held throughout the summer months brought people together in a safe place to share ideas, voice opinions and feel listened to and respected. HAIRE has been able to respond to comments and requests to make quick wins in the short term with opportunities to grow in the long term.

We are all thankful for the work of the amazing volunteers involved in this project. During June’s National Volunteer Month, service users were asked for any comments they would like to pass on to Feock’s volunteers as well as posting on Facebook pages for anyone who would like to thank a member of the community for their support. A beautiful “thank you tree” was put together by a talented resident and used as a backdrop to the CREATE workshop sessions.

Importantly, the work to look at the relevance of services and the creation of new ones won’t just “stop” when the research comes to an end. The communities involved are developing the sorts of skills and opportunities that can really make a difference and can evolve with the times to ensure an organic, thriving culture of listening and learning for positive, age-friendly action with the voices of residents at the fore.

The HAIRE project involves its stakeholders at regular intervals and in different ways throughout the project as we continue to pursue widespread, sustainable system change and to initiate and support innovative models of service delivery. One element of this is to hold regular steering group meetings, such as the Parish of Feock’s HAIRE Action Group Meeting. This took place in September 2021.

CREATE: New Models of Service Delivery (Spanish Translation)

One of the aims of HAIRE is to develop new models of service delivery for older people. In April and May of this year, we began our CREATE process, a participatory journey for stakeholders to develop social innovations. We wrote about this here in English and French (courtesy of Valentine Naude, our French intern). The university runs a Masters degree in Translation Studies, and as a result we now have this blog in a third language – Spanish! – thanks to student Amanda Ferguson.

CREATE: Nuevos modelos de prestación de servicios para personas mayores

 Ha sido una primavera fría y recia para todos los miembros de la comunidad HAIRE: el Reino Unido registró la temperatura más baja en abril desde 1922. Sin embargo, hoy brilla el sol y nos sentimos más esperanzados mientras nos preparamos para el verano y la apertura de nuestras comunidades. A finales de abril, los colaboradores de HAIRE habían elaborado los primeros borradores de los informes comunitarios de nuestras zonas piloto, que combinan la información obtenida en las conversaciones guiadas, los planes de acción y el análisis de los barrios. Nuestros colaboradores se preparan ahora para nuestro próximo gran reto: crear conjuntamente una prestación de servicios innovadora en los lugares piloto y fuera de ellos que responda a los retos identificados en sus zonas. Algunos retos son exclusivos de los centros piloto y otros se derivan de problemas comunes en la Europa rural.

A lo largo del mes de mayo, los colaboradores han recogido ideas y se han reunido con sus voluntarios, partes interesadas y comunidades de una manera extraordinaria. Por ejemplo, en East Sussex, los facilitadores de HAIRE han salido a pasear con su comunidad, y este acto de hacer que los voluntarios hablen con los miembros de la comunidad realmente los involucra en el proceso de generación de ideas y hace una aportación poderosa y profunda.

Aprovechando su experiencia en el pilotaje de acciones a nivel local, los colaboradores, las personas mayores, los colaboradores locales, los voluntarios y las agencias se reunirán en junio en un taller conjunto CREATE – Crossborder European Activity Testing Exercise (en español: Ejercicio Transfronterizo de Comprobación de la Actividad Europea) para compartir sus experiencias y apoyarse y asesorarse mutuamente. Los colaboradores se organizarán en Grupos de Aprendizaje en Acción, grupos transfronterizos que quieren trabajar juntos en innovaciones compartidas. El aprendizaje en acción es uno de los métodos que utilizan los programas eficaces para ayudar a los participantes a aplicar el aprendizaje en un grupo de apoyo. Este enfoque anima a los colaboradores a darle sentido desde la propia experiencia y apoya un auténtico intercambio transfronterizo de ideas.

También estamos aprovechando los talleres CREATE de junio para “conocernos” más personalmente. Todas las restricciones por el coronavirus han hecho que no hayamos podido viajar ni reunirnos con nuestros homólogos de los distintos países. La interacción con otros tendrá que esperar un poco más, pero hemos integrado un taller de escritura creativa en las sesiones, en el que veremos poemas sobre el envejecimiento en todos nuestros idiomas, nos escucharemos hablar en nuestras lenguas maternas y escribiremos y compartiremos nuestras propias experiencias personales y culturales sobre el envejecimiento. El ambiente de apoyo mutuo, la experiencia compartida y el aprendizaje cultural proporcionarán otra capa de profundidad y comprensión en nuestro intercambio transfronterizo mientras nos dirigimos hacia un cambio positivo para nuestras personas mayores.

Aquí está uno de nuestros poemas elegidos.

Larga vida, escrita por Elaine Feinstein

Finales de verano. El sol brilla. El eucalipto.
Es una fortuna más allá de cualquier merecedor
estar todavía aquí, sin más preocupaciones que las cotidianas,
ordenando plácidamente versos.
Contemplo un palo de canela
atado con rafia, los pinzones
en la hierba, y un arbusto rechoncho
que este año engendró un limón.
Estos días hablo menos de la muerte
que de los misterios de la supervivencia. Ya no
me siento sola, aún no soy frágil, y
después de la operación, reconozco cada respiración
como un milagro. Puede que mi generación no sea
ágil, pero perdónanos,
nos gustaría aguantar, tercamente
satisfechos – incluso mientras envejecemos.

CREATE Juin 2021 – Réflexion (French translation)

Our French intern, Valentine, has again translated this month’s blog for us into French.  It is a research reflection by Shuks Esmene, our postdoctoral research fellow. To read the original English language version, click here.

A l’occasion des ateliers CREATE, les partenaires du projet HAIRE se sont rassemblés pour discuter de leurs premières idées d’innovations destinées à améliorer le bien-être des séniors dans les sites pilotes. Les outils de recherche utilisés dans le cadre du projet représentent un aspect essentiel de l’apprentissage HAIRE. En particulier, les expériences et les idées de tous les partenaires, y compris des bénévoles et des participants, sont aussi importantes que ces outils le sont pour identifier des actions axées sur la personne et adaptées au milieu qui soient pertinentes à échelle locale.

Notre atelier de poésie a montré que les partenaires de prestation et les équipes de recherche du projet HAIRE sont parvenus à élaborer un environnement favorable à la discussion – même en ces temps troublés ! Les souvenirs de ces personnes âgées avec qui nous avons des liens privilégiés, par exemple des parents, des grands-parents, d’autres membres de la famille et des amis, ont inspiré une séance riche en émotions. Un de nos partenaires a fait remarquer :

« Ce ne sont pas des larmes de tristesse ! »

La remarque ci-dessus concernait un grand-parent défunt et résume la façon dont nos liens avec les personnes qui comptent pour nous s’étendent au-delà de leur présence physique auprès de nous. Bien qu’elles ne fussent qu’une parenthèse parmi les autres activités du projet, les réflexions que nous tirons de telles expériences peuvent aider HAIRE à amorcer des conversations relatives à l’intégration des soins dans nos communautés. Des soins plus approfondis. Des soins qui surpassent les besoins fonctionnels des individus. Ces besoins sont extrêmement importants, bien sûr. Cependant, le bien-être ne se limite pas à la somme des besoins fonctionnels d’un individu.

Les Conversations Guidées du projet HAIRE ont révélé que les activités et les passions qui importent aux participants (marcher, tricoter, lire et se rendre à des marchés locaux, entre autres) leur ont apporté de la joie et, malheureusement, de la tristesse lorsqu’ils n’ont pu s’y adonner pendant la pandémie. Ces conclusions ne sont en aucune façon propres au projet HAIRE, mais elles lui offrent plusieurs possibilités. Le réseau HAIRE, constitué de personnes soudées et attentionnées, va nous permettre de réfléchir différemment à notre façon de procéder face à ces conclusions. Certes, il est important de faire une liste des activités et des passions présentes dans une région, et de s’assurer que ces activités sont proposées à ses habitants, mais il faudrait aussi offrir l’opportunité aux séniors de développer de nouveaux centres d’intérêts et de nouvelles passions – ce serait une façon d’ajouter de la capacité à un lieu donné. La variété des activités et les activités extracurriculaires sont considérées comme une partie fondamentale du développement de l’enfant (1).

Je pense souvent à cette façon que nous avons d’essayer de trouver et de doser un assortiment d’activités spécifiques dont la population adulte puisse bénéficier – plutôt que de nous appliquer à mieux comprendre les modalités du bien-être de chaque individu. Comme nous l’avons dit durant nos discussions sur l’innovation au deuxième jour des ateliers CREATE, cela peut faire la différence d’« être prêt à commencer modestement » afin de produire des innovations qui restent ouvertes aux contributions des habitants – particulièrement si les opinions et points de vue reçoivent une réponse et ne sont pas perdus au fil des démarches administratives. A ce titre, les solutions numériques contribuent largement à améliorer la sensibilisation, mais c’était aussi encourageant de voir des idées se développer lors des ateliers autour des activités en face à face et de la notion d’« aller vers les gens ».

Dans leurs réponses aux Conversations Guidées, les participants ont communiqué l’importance qu’ils attachent aux interactions en face à face et aux évènements de rassemblement convivial. De plus, même si nous l’avons appris par le biais d’anecdotes, nous ne pouvons oublier que les commerçants et les docteurs étaient bien plus profondément intégrés dans les quartiers ruraux par le passé. Les services avaient plus souvent lieu en face à face, et ces expériences doivent être prises en compte lorsque l’on réunit des personnes âgées.

Par ailleurs, des préoccupations primordiales vis-à-vis du profil des participants recrutés jusqu’ici ont été soulevées lors des ateliers CREATE. On considère souvent qu’une méthode de communication qui attire et inclus les groupes vulnérables et marginalisés représente un défi (2). Les communautés inclusives doivent s’assurer que tout le monde sent qu’il ou elle fait partie du lieu dans lequel il ou elle vit, et que l’opportunité d’exprimer ses opinions leur soit donnée de façon à ce que tout le monde puisse contribuer à façonner l’avenir du lieu en question. Parvenir à une compréhension plus inclusive du bien-être représentera un défi important pour le projet HAIRE, et la démarche consistant à « être prêt à commencer modestement » pourra nous être bénéfique dans cette mesure également. La recherche a parfois tendance à se focaliser sur des chiffres et des objectifs à accomplir, tous les deux générés par des groupes larges et soi-disant représentatifs. Toutefois, si nous nous posons des questions essentielles sur les points de vue variés que nous avons recueillis pendant les Conversations Guidées, nous pouvons commencer modestement. Des questions telles que : comment se fait-il que quelqu’un qui s’est occupé des autres, et qui a travaillé dur dans un secteur qui n’est pas généreux économiquement, peut se retrouver dans une position financière précaire plus tard dans sa vie ?, et, que pouvons-nous faire pour impliquer quelqu’un à échelle locale quand cette personne n’a pas pu développer et/ou approfondir des centres d’intérêt à cause d’une enfance ou d’un début de vie d’adulte mouvementés ?

Enfin, la question qui selon moi ressort le plus de nos séances CREATE est :

« Pourquoi sommes-nous, en tant que société, si mauvais à cela ? »

La réponse se trouve peut-être dans une nouvelle conception des soins, une conception selon laquelle les soins seraient reçus et donnés par des individus dans leurs communautés, et ne seraient pas simplement un service dédié à répondre aux besoins fonctionnels des personnes âgées. Fait encourageant, nous avons parfois accompli cela au sein de projet HAIRE – que ce soit entre les chercheurs et les équipes de prestation, entre les équipes de prestation et les bénévoles, et/ou entre les bénévoles et les participants. Notre prochain défi sera de trouver des façons d’impliquer les donneurs de soins dans le projet, sur tous les sites pilotes, plus étroitement encore. J’ai hâte d’affronter ce défi.

Footnotes

1. Metsäpelto, R., & Pulkkinen, L. (2012). Socioemotional Behavior and School Achievement in Relation to Extracurricular Activity Participation in Middle Childhood. Scandinavian Journal Of Educational Research, 56(2), 167-182. doi: 10.1080/00313831.2011.581681

2. Meyer, C., Evans, D., Soucat, A., Dkhimi, F., Akweongo, P., & Kessy, F. et al. (2018). Leaving no one behind? Reaching the informal sector, poor people and marginalised groups with Social Health Protection. Journal Of Poverty And Social Justice. doi: 10.1332/175982718x1536143686739